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HISTORY
OF
NORTH BRIDGEWATER,

CHAPTER XII.
THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR.

Controversy between England and America.--Acts of Trade.--Sugar Act.--Stamp Act.--Tea Destroyed in Boston Harbor.--Boston Port Bill.--Preparations for War.--Minute-Men.--Company marched on Lexington Alarm.--List of Persons in the various Companies in the Service during the War.--Shay's Rebellion.--List of Soldiers called into the Service to quell the same at Taunton.

NO period in the history of the world is more interesting, or more full of moral and political instruction than that of the American Revolution. The controversy between Great Britain and the American Colonies arose in regard to the right of Parliament to tax the Colonies while they were not allowed the privilege of representation in that body. Parliament determined to make the experiment, which it did, and the result of which is familiar to all readers of history. The first of a series of oppressive acts was that known as the "Acts of Trade," that tended to destroy all trade with the Colonies. The second act required a duty to be paid into the English treasury on all sugar, molasses, indigo, coffee, wines, etc., that came into the Colonies. This act passed April 5, 1764, and was called the "Sugar Act."(1)

At the time of the passage of this act, it was resolved to quarter 10,000 soldiers somewhere in America. Both of these acts were strongly opposed by the Colonies, and laid the foundation for a still greater breach in the trade between the two countries. Trade in the Colonies was principally confined to home productions, and the people determined not to import anything that it was possible to do without. Parliament finding the source of income very small, sought for another way to raise funds.

On the 22d of March, 1765, the famous "Stamp Act" was passed, to go into effect on the 1st of November following. This act required all colonial documents, as bonds, notes, and deeds, to be written on stamped paper, and to bear the royal seal, or to be of no value.

A general burst of indignation followed the passage of this act. Legislative bodies passed resolves, and protested against the measure. Societies in great numbers were formed, called "Sons of Liberty," who determined to resist parliamentary oppression. People began to wear cloth of their own manufacture, and denied themselves of foreign luxuries. Economy became the order of the day, the excess of which was soon felt in England, as many manufacturers were idle for want of a market for their goods, and laborers began to feel the consequences of her folly.

The King and Parliament soon saw their error, and repealed this act March 18, 1766, at the same time declaring they had a right to tax the Colonies whenever they "deemed it expedient," thereby intending not to give up their right to taxation, but only to change the form; for the next year they passed an act levying a duty on glass, paper, paint, tea, etc. This only created continued opposition, which was such that Parliament thought proper to repeal all former resolves in regard to taxation, reserving a small tax of threepence a pound on tea. The strong resolutions passed by the Colonies not to import or consume tea finally deprived the English Government of a revenue from that source, and an attempt was made to import it through the agency of the East India Company, who had a right to export teas to all ports free of duty. Several ships were sent to the large cities in America. Those sent to Boston were consigned to some of Gov. Hutchinson's relatives. The inhabitants were determined it should not be landed, and it was not. It was thrown into the sea by a body of men disguised as Indians. As soon as the news of the destruction of the tea arrived in England, Parliament resolved to punish the devoted town of Boston. Next came the "Boston Port Bill," forbidding the landing or loading of goods in the harbor, passed March 25, 1774.

All these measures that were passed by Parliament did not intimidate the Americans, but served to strengthen their firm purpose not to submit to their oppression in any form.

When the Legislature of Massachusetts met at Salem in June, 1774, a meeting of delegates from all the Colonies was proposed, which soon after met at Philadelphia September 4, 1774, when a declaration of rights was agreed upon.

At this time everything assumed the appearance of opposition by force. Fortifications were thrown up in Boston by Gen. Gage, who had been appointed governor by Parliament. The Provincial Congress met at Concord October 11, 1774, where measures were taken for arming the whole province. Twelve thousand men were ordered to be raised, and to hold themselves in readiness at a moment's warning, and were called "Minute Men." Companies were formed through all parts of the country. Provisions and military stores were collected at various places, particularly at Concord. Gen. Gage, wishing to destroy the means of carrying on the war by the provincials, detached Lieut.-Colonel Smith and Major Pitcairn, April 18, 1775, to proceed to Concord for the purpose of destroying the military stores which he had learned had been stored there. Information having been sent in advance to Concord of their movements, the people flew to arms, and marched in small squads to where they were needed.

When the British troops arrived at Lexington, about five o'clock on the morning of the 19th, they were met by a small band of militia, paraded in front of the village church. Major Pitcairn rode up to them and bade them disperse, which command was followed by a scattering fire, and a general skirmish ensued, in which eight men were killed and several wounded. The main body of the troops passed on to Concord, where they arrived soon after sunrise, and a fight known as the "Concord Fight" took place. At Lexington was the first blood shed in defence of the liberty of the people, and immediately on the departure of the troops from that place, by an arrangement previously made, the committees of safety throughout the whole country despatched messengers on horse in every direction, so that by evening every town within one hundred miles was informed that the war had commenced. The news was scattered throughout the towns by guns being fired, and other signals being given, so that people in the remote sections of a town were soon aware that they were needed. The news of this battle arrived in Bridgewater early in the day, and before sunset the company had collected and were ready for a march.

After a long and laborious search among the Revolutionary rolls, we have found the following names, of those who have taken part in the Revolutionary War, from North Bridgewater. The first we find is the company of Minute Men that marched on the 19th of April, 1775, on the occasion of the Lexington alarm.

List of Captain Josiah Hayden's company in Colonel Bailey's regiment of Minute Men, April 19, 1775:--

					Josiah Hayden, Captain.
		Nathan Packard, First Lieut. 			William Packard, Corporal. 
		Zechariah Gurney, Second Lieut. 		Timothy Ames, Corporal. 
		Reuben Packard, Sergeant. 			Jeremiah Beals, Corporal. 
		Joseph Cole, Sergeant. 				Eleazer Cole, Drummer. 
		Henry Kingman, Sergeant. 			Silvanus Packard, Drummer, 

						PRIVATES.
		Simeon Alden, 		Fobes Field, 		Jonathan Packard, 
		Noah Ames, 		Mark Ford, 		Jonathan Perkins, Jr. 
		Daniel Ames, 		Richard Field, 		Jonas Reynolds,
		Japhet Beal, 		Ephraim Groves, 	Joseph Reynolds, 
		Simeon Brett, 		John Gurney, 		Joseph Sylvester, 
		Samuel Brett, 		Micah Gurney, 		Charles Snell, 
		Seth Bryant, 		Anthony Dike, 		Uriah Southworth, 
		William Cole, 		Robert Howard, 		John Thompson, 
		Ephraim Cole, 		Daniel Howard, 		Enos Thayer, 
		Jonathan Cary, 		Oliver Howard, 		Ezekiel Washburn, 
		Daniel Dickerman, 	Bela Howard, 		Ebenezer Warren, 
		Nathan Edson, 		Simeon Keith, 		Job Bryant, 
		Barnabas Edson, 	Lemuel Packard, 	Mannasseh Dickerman, 
				Jacob Edson, 		Thomas Pratt.

Also Captain Robert Orr's company, Col. John Bailey's regiment, who marched from Bridgewater in consequence of the Lexington alarm:--

		Daniel Cary, one month and one day in service.
		Luke Packard, one month and one day in service.

Captain Robert Webster's company, Gen. Pomeroy's regiment:--

Asa Packard, Fifer, in service three months and twelve days from April 27, 1775.

We find in the roll of Captain Nathan Mitchell's company, that marched from Bridgewater in consequence of the Lexington alarm, the 19th of April, 1775, the name of

		Jonathan Cary, in service eleven days.

Again on the 23d of April, 1775, the Provincial Congress resolved to raise thirteen thousand five hundred men from Massachusetts immediately, the term of service to be eight months. Among these we find the following companies:--

A muster-roll of Captain John Porter's company in Col. Paul D. Sargent's regiment.

							Time of service.
		John Porter, Captain . . . . . . . . June 29 to August, 1775.
		Isaiah Fuller, Sergeant  . . . . . . July 7       "       "
		Uriah Southworth, Corporal . . . . . June 29      "       "
		Ezekiel Washburn, Corporal . . . . . June 29      "       "
		Samuel Cole, Drummer . . . . . . . . July 7       "       "
		Luther Cary, Fifer . . . . . . . . . June 29 to August, 1775.
		Daniel Ames, Private . . . . . . . . July 7       "       "
		Ebenezer Edson, "  . . . . . . . . . June 30      "       "
		Benjamin Fuller, " . . . . . . . . . June 30      "       "
		William Shaw,   "  . . . . . . . . . June 27      "       "

No man of this company received any guns, bayonets, cartridge-boxes, or clothing, excepting what he provided himself with.

A complete list of men in Captain Josiah Hayden's company, in Col. John Thomas's regiment, to August 1, 1775:--

								M.	W.	D.
		Josiah Hayden, Captain, . . . . . . . . . . . . 3	1	1
		Zechariah Gurney, First Lieutenant, . . . . . . 3	1	1
		Joseph Cole, Ensign,  . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3	1	1
		Eleazer Cole, Sergeant, . . . . . . . . . . . . 3	1	1
		Ephraim Groves, Sergeant, . . . . . . . . . . . 3	1	1
		Job Bryant, Corporal, . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3	1	1
		Richard Field, Corporal,  . . . . . . . . . . . 3	1	1
		Silvanus Packard, Drummer,  . . . . . . . . . . 3	1	1
		Simeon Brett, Private,  . . . . . . . . . . . . 3	1	1
		Luther Cary,     "    . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3	0	5
		Southworth Cole, "    . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2	0	5
		Thomas Crafts,   "    . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3	1	1
		Daniel Dickerman, "   . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3	1	1
		Anthony Dike,    "    . . . . . . . . . . . . . 	 Armorer.
		William French,  "    . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0	3	3
		Micah Gurney,    "    . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3	1	1
		Jonathan Packard, "   . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3	1	1
		Oliver Packard,  "    . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3	1	1
		Thaddeus Pratt,  "    . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3	1	1
		Joseph Snell,    "    . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2	1	1

In Captain Daniel Lothrop's company, in Col. John Bailey's regiment, for eight months' service, from May 3, 1775, were the following:--

								Time of service.
		Ephraim Jackson, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Three months.
		Ebenezer Dunbar, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . One     "
		Adam Howard, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Three   " and six days.
		Nathan Leach,  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . One     "  "  two  "
		Daniel Packard,	 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . One     "  "  two  "
		Matthew Pettingill,  . . . . . . . . . . . . One     "  "  two  "

A muster-roll of Captain Frederick Pope's company, to August 1, 1775:--

Eight months' Service.				Time of Enlistment.
	Eleazer Snow, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 25, 1775.
	Mannassah Dickerman,  . . . . . . . . . . June 24, 1775.
	Eleazer Snow, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 27, 1775.

Names of men enlisted in Captain Thomas Pierce's company of artillery, in Colonel Knox's regiment, for service at Roxbury, December 16, 1775:--

Elijah Packard,   Jonathan Packard.

An exact roll of Captain Elisha Mitchell's company, in Colonel Simeon Cary's regiment, that marched April 2, 1775:--

					Joseph Cole, Lieutenant.
			Joseph Snell, Corporal.		Samuel Cole, Drummer.

					       PRIVATES.
		Daniel Ames, 		Thomas Craft, 		Daniel Cary,
		Jonathan Cary, 		Jonathan Keith, 	Simeon Keith,
		Josiah Packard, 	Ichabod Packard, 	Luke Packard.

Captain Eliakim Howard's company, in Colonel Edward Mitchell's regiment, that was ordered to march to the service of the United States, March 4, 1776:--

		Daniel Howard, 		Simeon Keith, 		Jeremiah Thayer, Jr.

Captain Henry Prentiss's company, in Colonel Marshall's regiment, raised for the defence of Boston, July 5, 1776:--

	Zechariah Gurney, Lieutenant. 		Joseph Cole, Lieutenant.

List of Abiel Pierce's company, in Colonel Nicholas Dike's regiment, from August 3, 1776, to November 29, 1776:--

		Barzillai Field, 		Stephen Pettingill, 	Ichabod Packard.

The following persons were in the service under Captain Henry Prentiss, in Colonel Thomas Marshall's regiment, to August 1, 1776:--

							Time of Enlistment.
		Zechariah Gurney, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  May   4
		John Thompson,  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  June  8
		Ezekiel Washburn, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  June  8
		Zechariah Gurney, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  June  8
		Gideon Lincoln, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  June  8
		Mark Ford,  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  June  8
		Enos Thayer,  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  July  8
		Joseph Reynolds,  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  July 12
		David Reynolds, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  July 12

This company was also in service from August to November 1, 1776, at the expiration of which time they enlisted for one month additional service.

A muster-roll of Captain Snell's company, in Colonel Mitchell's regiment of militia, who marched on the alarm to Rhode Island, December 8, 1776, and were in service two weeks and two days:--

		David Packard, First Lieutenant. 	Jeremiah Beal, Sergeant.
		John Packard, Second Lieutenant. 	Ezra Cary, Sergeant.
		William Packard, Sergeant. 		Samuel Brett, Corporal.

						PRIVATES.
		Timothy Ames,		Jonathan Hayden,	Charles Snell,
		Daniel Ames, 		Fobes Field, 		Eleazer Snow,
		Jonas Packard, 		Joshua Ames, 		Ephraim Packard,
				Simeon Alden, 		Henry Thayer.

The following are those having served in the artillery companies.

A roll of officers and men in Captain Daniel Lothrop's company, in Colonel Thomas Crafts's regiment of artillery, in the service of Massachusetts Bay, up to the first day of August, 1776:--

								Time of Enlistment.
		Joseph Cole, First Lieutenant,  . . . . . . . . . . . May  9, 1776
		Richard Field, Sergeant,  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 13, 1776
		Samuel Cole, Drummer, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 16, 1776
		Jeremiah Thayer, Mattross,  . . . . . . . . . . . . . May 20, 1776

This company was also in service from August 1 to November 1, 1776, also from November 1, 1776, to February 1, 1777.

Eleazer Snow enlisted in this company November 1, and was in service with the above-named men from February 1, 1776, to the 7th of May of the same year.

January 26, 1777, a resolve was passed by the Assembly, making a requisition on Massachusetts for every seventh man of sixteen years old and upward, without any exception (save the people called Quakers), to fill up the fifteen battalions called for by the Continental Congress, to serve three years or during the war. The following are those enlisted from Bridgewater:--

		   Regiment.	Time of	  Time of	Names of Companies
				Service.  Enlistment.	  or Captains.

Ebenezer Edson,	   Crane's,	 36	  3 years	Frothingham.
Micah Gurney,	   Thirteenth,	 35 24	  3 years	Light Infantry.
Joshua Cushman,	   Ninth,	 33  0	  3 years	Miller.
Ephraim Groves,	   Crane's,	 36  0	  3 years	Frothingham.
Nehemiah Packard,  Thirteenth,	 45 16	  During war	Light Infantry.
Benjamin Packard,  Thirteenth,	 45  3	  During war	Allen.
Daniel Packard,	   Fourteenth,	 32 39	  3 years	8th Company.

The following persons marched on a secret expedition to Tiverton, Rhode Island, and were in service from September 25 to October 30, 1777:--

	Nathan Packard, First Lieutenant.		Jonathan Packard, Second Lieutenant.
				Nathaniel Manley, Sergeant.

					PRIVATES.
	Seth Edson, 		Simeon Packard, 	Elijah Packard, 
	Caleb Howard, 		Shepard Packard, 	John Pratt, 
			John Pratt, 2d, 	John Packard.

Each of this company received a bounty of twenty dollars per month.

Captain Edward Cobb's company that marched from Bridgewater to Bristol, Rhode Island, April 21, 1777, for two months' service:--

								Time in Service.
								M.	W.	D.
		Daniel Howard, First Lieutenant,  . . . . . . . 2	4	0
		Hezekiah Packard, Fifer,  . . . . . . . . . . . 2	0	4 1/2
		Barzillai Field,  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2	0	4 1/2
		Zechariah Gurney, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2	0	4 1/2
		Oliver Packard, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2	0	4 1/2
		Jonathan Snow,  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2	0	4
		Hugh Carr,  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2	0	4

We also find in Captain Stetson's company, Colonel Marshall's regiment, the name of

Daniel Packard, enlisted April 9th, 1777.

Joshua Warren was in Captain Bartlett's company, in Colonel Wesson's regiment, May 7, 1777.

Solomon Packard was in service in Captain Benjamin Edgell's company, Colonel John Jacobs's regiment, five months and sixteen days, 1777.

A draft was made for men to reinforce the northern army, January 1, 1778. For this service, in Captain Jacob Allen's company, Colonel John Bailey's regiment, from Massachusetts, in the camp at Valley Forge, January 24, 1778, is the name of

Caleb Howard, Corporal.

A pay-roll of Captain Nathan Packard's company, in Colonel Thomas Carpenter's regiment of militia, in the State of Massachusetts, from July 25 to September 9, 1778, in service in Rhode Island:--

					Nathan Packard, Captain.
		Jesse Perkins, First Lieutenant.	Nathaniel Orcutt, Third Lieutenant.
		Joseph Reynolds, Corporal.		Ebenezer Dunbar, Corporal.

						PRIVATES.
		Mannasseh Dickerman, 	Amzi Brett, 		John Pratt,
		Simeon Keith, 		Samuel Craft, 		Daniel Pettingill,
		David Packard, 		Mark Ford, 		Simeon Packard,
				David Reynolds, 	John Thompson.

Captain John Ames's company of militia, who marched to Rhode Island and joined Colonel Nathaniel Wade's regiment on the 27th of June, 1778, for a term of twenty days, agreeably to a resolve of the General Court:--

				Daniel Howard, First Lieutenant.
					Lemuel Gurney, Fifer.

						PRIVATES.
		Daniel Cary, 		Joshua Warren, 		Thomas Pratt,
		Seth Edson, 		Thomas Packard, 	Barzillai Field, 
		Asa Keith, 		Oliver Packard, 	Micah Pratt.

"A return of men mustered for Colonel Robinson's regiment by James Hatch, muster-master for the county of Plymouth, to serve in ye New England States until January, 1778:"--

		Uriah Southworth, 	Simeon Dunbar,		Southworth Cole,
		Alpheus Cary, 		Eleazer Snow,		Oliver Packard,
		Peter Edson, 		Daniel Howard,		Luther Cary,
				Abiah Southworth, July 26, 1778.

In Captain Joseph Cole's company, Colonel John Jacobs's regiment, in the Continental service one year from January 1, 1778, we find the following names:--

					Joseph Cole, Captain.
		Isaiah Fuller, First Lieutenant.	Hezekiah Packard, Fifer.

						PRIVATES.
		Alpheus Cary,		Peter Edson,		Ephraim Churchill, 
				Joshua Warren,		Luther Cary.

In September, 1778, the following persons were mustered into the service of the States, to serve till January 1, 1779:--

		Hezekiah Packard,	Jeremiah Thayer,	Zechariah Gurney, 
					Oliver Packard.

Isaiah Fuller was a lieutenant in Captain Joseph Cole's company, in Colonel John Jacobs's regiment, from April 1, 1778, to January, 1779, for nine months' service.

In Captain Calvin Partridge's company of militia, in Colonel Samuel Pierce's regiment, stationed at Little Compton, Rhode Island, April 30, 1779:--

		Zechariah Gurney, First Lieutenant.	James Packard, Sergeant.
					Lemuel Gurney, Private.
				     Zechariah Watkins, Lieutenant.

						PRIVATES.
		Solomon Hill, 		Daniel Brett, 		Shepard Packard,

were in Colonel Ezra Wood's regiment for one month; enlisted for service at Ticonderoga in May and part of June, 1778.

Shepard Packard also enlisted in Captain Edward Sparrow's company, Colonel Nathan Tyler's regiment, in June, 1779.

Joseph Sylvester enlisted in Colonel Bailey's regiment, for three years or during the war, October 24, 1779.

The pay-roll for six-months men raised in the town of Bridgewater in July, 1780, for Continental service, contains the following names from the North Parish:--

		Akerman Pettingill,	Zechariah Gurney,	Hugh Carr,
					Solomon Packard.
Also
		Simeon Keith, Sergeant.		Jeremiah Thayer, Corporal.
				Jacob Packard, Private.

That marched on the alarm to Rhode Island, by order of Council, July 22, 1780, in service from July 30 to August 9.

Captain David Packard's company, in Colonel Eliphalet Cary's regiment, who marched on the alarm to Rhode Island, July 22, 1780, in service from July 23 to August 9, 1780:--

		David Packard, Captain.		Eleazer Snow, Second Lieutenant.

						SERGEANTS.
		Daniel Howard,		William Packard,	Ephraim Packard,
			 		  Samuel Brett.

						CORPORALS.
		Fobes Field,		Ephraim Cole,		Jonathan Cary,
			Luther Cary, Fife Major.	Micah Gurney, Drummer.

						PRIVATES.
		Philip Packard,		Richard Field,		Barnabas Pratt,
		Daniel Howard,		Ephraim Field,		Nathaniel Snell,
		Bela Howard,		Zechariah Howard,	Joseph Reynolds,
		William Brett,		Jonathan Reynolds,	Enos Thayer,
		Joshua Ames,		James Perkins,		Eleazer Cole,
		Alpheus Cary,		Daniel Dickerman,	Timothy Reynolds,
		Timothy Ames,		Daniel Ames,		Jeremiah Beal,
		Howard Cary,		Solomon Hill,		Samuel Chesman,
		Lemuel Packard,		Adin Packard,		Eleazer Snow, Jr.,
		Barnabas Pratt, Jr.,	Levi Packard,		Mannasseh Dickerman,
		Thomas Packard,		Abiah Packard,		Job Ames,
		Charles Hayden,		Joshua Cushman,		Noah Ames,
		David Gurney,		Ichabod Howard,		John Gurney.

An order was passed by the Assembly, to raise two thousand men to reinforce northern armies, in 1780.

In this service, we find from the North Parish, in Bridgewater,--

				Hugh Carr,		Akerman Pettingill,
in Captain Hancock's company, who marched from Springfield July 4, 1780, for six months.

Zechariah Gurney was in the Eleventh Division, and marched from Springfield under command of Ensign Bancroft, for six months, July 11, 1780.

Solomon Packard was in the seventh division of six-months men, who marched from Springfield under the command of Captain Dix, July 7th, 1780.

The following is a list of Captain Nathan Packard's company, in Major Eliphalet Cary's regiment, that marched on account of the alarm in Rhode Island, July 22, 1780. By order of council from North Bridgewater:--

					Nathan Packard, Captain.

		Jesse Perkins, First Lieutenant.	John Thompson, Sergeant.

						PRIVATES.
		Mark Packard,		Seth Kingman,		Daniel Shaw,
		Josiah Packard,		Daniel Manley,		Naphtali Shaw,
		Anthony Dike,		Shepard Packard,	Gilbert Snell,
		Mark Perkins,		Jonathan Perkins,	John Tilden,
		Barnabas Edson,		Caleb Packard,		Rufus Brett,
		Seth Edson,		Simeon Packard, Jr.,	Asa Packard,
		Ebenezer Edson,		Jacob Packard,		Josiah Edson,
		Benjamin Keith,		William Shaw, Jr.,	Josiah Perkins, Jr.

Again, we find in the company of Captain Luke Bicknell, in Colonel Putnam's regiment at West Point, New York, 1781, several persons from North Bridgewater:--

		Joshua Cushman,		Thomas Packard,		Isaiah Packard, 
		Simeon Packard,		Marlboro' Packard,	Daniel Alden.

The following persons enlisted in Colonel John Bailey's regiment, January 25, 1782, to reinforce the Continental army:--

		Joseph Sylvester,	Benjamin Kingman,	Daniel Packard,
				Noah Pratt,		John Thompson.

We have now given the readers an account of those who took part in the war that resulted in our national independence. Imperfect as this list may be, owing to the unconnected tattered rolls at the State House, we have endeavored to get the names of all who did military duty during the eight years' strife between England and America, and place them in readable form. We have brought the account down to the close of the war, or to the time of the signing of the treaty at Paris, in November, 1782. The war had grown exceedingly unpopular after the surrender of Cornwallis at York-town, in October, 1781, although nothing definite was done till March, 1782, when the House of Commons voted not to prosecute the war any further. At the close of that year, commissioners were chosen on both sides, who met at Paris, and after a long consultation, they agreed upon the articles of peace. These were signed November 30th of that year, and on the 20th of January, 1783, hostilities ceased between the two countries.

On the 19th of April, just eight years after the battle of Lexington, Washington issued his proclamation of peace. Thus ended a war of nearly eight years' duration, in which a hundred thousand lives were lost, and millions of property destroyed. It was the decision of this war that established the United States among the powers of the earth. In looking over the list of persons that took part in the battles of our country, we should not forget those who were left at home to provide for the families of absent ones. In many instances the women of the town had to till the soil to obtain what food was actually needed for subsistence; in short, every nerve was brought into requisition to provide home-made cloth, stockings, shirts, and blankets, that were called for by the government in large quantities; and although the women, wives and mothers of those who fought the battles, could not fight in the face of the foe with muskets, they did their part in aiding and abetting; and their deeds were as heroic in many instances as those we record; may their memory ever be cherished with gratitude, and stimulate us all to act well our part, and thus be mutual helpers to each other through life, that at its close we may have the satisfaction of feeling that we have done our whole duty, and done it well.

SHAY'S REBELLION.

At the conclusion of the Revolutionary War, peace and independence having been established, the attention of the people was directed to the finances of the country. The English merchants flooded the country with foreign goods, and thereby drained us of specie, and ruined the manufacturers. This involved merchants and others in debt.

The masses of the people, finding themselves burdened under the weight of taxes and loss of employment, became quite disheartened and uneasy, and hence could easily be led into almost any kind of a scheme to relieve their burdens. Debts could not be collected, and the heavy taxes were the ruin of a great many. During this state of feeling, a few persons, taking advantage of that condition of affairs, called a public meeting, which was held at Hatfield, Massachusetts, in August, 1786, to see what they could do to better themselves. This meeting so inflamed the people that a mob of fifteen hundred persons assembled at Northampton, to prevent the sitting of the courts. From thence the insurrection fire continued to burn and spread throughout the State. One Daniel Shay, of Pelham, Massachusetts, was one of the principal movers in the scheme. A similar company was collected at Springfield, in September following. Here they found a military force sufficient to stop their proceedings. Similar gatherings were had in the towns where the county courts were held, in other parts of the State, the object being to stop all means of collecting debts by the usual process of law. Such a gathering was had at the court-house in Taunton, Bristol County, in September, 1786.

At this place, as before, the insurgents found that preparations had been made for a grand reception; and after a delay of a day or two, in frightening the people in that vicinity, the mob dispersed.

Among those called to suppress this rebellion at Taunton, were the following companies from Bridgewater. The list below gives the names of those from the North Parish of Bridgewater:--

"A muster and pay role of ye 7th company of militea in the 3d regiment, in the county of Plymouth, and commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Orr,--
		Lemuel Packard, Captain.		Howard Cary, Sergeant. 
		Daniel Cary, First Lieutenant.		Ephraim Field, Corporal. 
		Samuel Brett, Second Lieutenant.	Josiah Reynolds, Drummer. 
		Parmenas Packard, Sergeant.		Ephraim Sturtevant, Fifer. 

						PRIVATES.
		Oliver Howard,		William Reynolds,	James Cary,
		Robert Howard,		Barzillai Field,	Daniel Ames,
		John Howard,		Gideon Howard,		Thomas Packard,
		Jonas Howard,		Seth Edson,		John Crafts.
"The above-named persons were in service from September 9th to the 13th, 1786.
		Sworn to before				JUSTICE HOWARD.
							LEMUEL PACKARD, Captain."
"A muster and pay role of Captain John Thompson's company of militia, in service from September 9 to September 13, 1786:--
					John Thompson, Captain.

						PRIVATES.
		Levi Washburn,		Thomas Thompson, Jr.,	Nathan Keith,
		Jeremiah Thayer,	Jonathan Keith,		Daniel Bruyint,
		Mark Perkins,		Josiah Packard,		Seth Kingman,
		Josiah Perkins,		Jonathan Perkins, Jr.,	Calvin Brett,
		Amasa Brett,		Elijah Packard,		William Shaw,
		Leonard Orcutt,		Peter Bruyint,		Henry Kingman,
		Oliver Packard,		Ichabod Bruyint,	Ichabod Edson, 
		Obadiah West,		Calvin Bruyint,		Ephraim Groves,
		Nathan Packard,		Job Bruyint,		Japhet Beals,
		Nathan Packard, Jr.,	Job Bruyint, Jr.,	Jonas Howard,
		David Edson, Jr.,	Daniel Perkins,		Beza Bruyint.

		Sworn to before				JUSTICE HOWARD.
							JOHN THOMPSON, Captain."
"Bridgewater, September ye 9th, 1786.

(1) The tax on rum was ninepence, molasses, sixpence per gallon, and sugar, five shillings per hundred.