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NATIVE AND RESIDENT LAWYERS.

BY FRANCIS H. LINCOLN.

Pages 327-340

   In the following sketches the attempt has been made to include all those lawyers who have practised their profession in Hingham, whether native or resident, and also those natives who went from here to other places. It has been necessary to confine the notices for the most part to facts, but it is a record of men of ability, and did space permit, there would be ample opportunity to enlarge upon their worth as members of an honorable profession.

JOHN A. ANDREW [II. 10] was born in Windham, Maine, May 31, 1818. His early education was in the public schools, and he was fitted for college at the Bridgton (Me.) Academy, which he entered in 1831. He is described while in the Academy as "a well behaved boy, and a general favorite with the village people. He had a kindly heart, but an indomitable will, which firmly contended against wrong and oppression." He was graduated at Bowdoin College in 1837, and in the same year he entered the law-office of Henry W. Fuller, Esq., of Boston. For more than twenty years afterwards he practised law in Boston, without interruption to the regular duties of his profession. In December, 1848, he was married to Eliza Jones Hersey, of Hingham, and from that date his home was for a great part of the time at Hingham. While living here he was nominated for State senator, but defeated. In 1860 he was a delegate to the National Republican Convention at Chicago, when Abraham Lincoln was first nominated for the presidency. In the same year Mr. Andrew was elected governor of Massachusetts, and filled that office for the five years from 1861 to 1865, during the stormy period of the War of the Rebellion. After the close of the war he resumed the practice of his profession in Boston. He died in Boston Oct. 30, 1867.

There is no need to recount at length in this connection the marvellous capacity of the great "War Governor" for the exigency which brought forth his powers. That is a part of the military history of the time. Nor need his anti-slavery sentiments through life be more than alluded to. It is with satisfaction that we remember that he lies buried in one of our cemeteries, in accordance with his expressed desire, and that his statue stands there to remind the young and old of his nobility of character and his unswerving loyalty to principle.

JOHN F. ANDREW [II. 10], the son of Hon. John A. Andrew, was born in Hingham Nov. 26, 1850. His early education was obtained in Boston, and he was graduated from Harvard College in 1872. He studied law in the Harvard Law School, and received the degree of LL.B. in 1875, after which he continued his legal studies in the office of Brooks, Ball, and Storey, in Boston, and was admitted to the bar of Suffolk County in 1875. Mr. Andrew was representative to the General Court from the Ninth Suffolk District in 1880, 1881, and 1882, and was State senator in 1884. He was a delegate to the National Republican Convention at Chicago in 1884, and during the presidential campaign of that year was president of the Young Men's Republican and Independent Organization of the city of Boston. He was Democratic candidate for governor of Massachusetts in 1886, and was a member of the 51st and 52d Congresses, being first elected in 1888. He is a member of the New England Historic-Gencalogical Society.

SHEARJASHUB BOURNE was the first person who practised law in Hingham. He came from Barnstable, and was here for a few years, probably between 1794 and 1800. His office was in a building on the northeast side of Broad Bridge, where the railroad track now is. He afterwards removed to Boston, and was a practising lawyer there until his death.

WALTER L. BOUVÉ [II. 89], the son of Thomas T. and Emily G. (Lincoln) Bouvé, was born in Boston, Oct. 28, 1849. His education was obtained at schools in Hingham and Boston, and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he was fitted for the profession of a civil engineer. From 1868 to 1870 he was engaged in Illinois as division engineer of the Toledo, Wabash, and Western Railroad, and in other railroad surveys. He was also engaged in engineering in Massachusetts and Rhode Island from 1870 to 1872. He subsequently studied law at the Harvard Law School, where he was graduated in 1879. He was admitted to the bar Nov. 13, 1880, and began practice with offices in Boston and Hingham. He was appointed special justice of the Second District Court of Plymouth County April 1, 1885, and assistant district attorney for the Southeastern District of Massachusetts in February, 1890. He was commissioned first lieutenant in the First Corps of Cadets, M. V. M., in February, 1889.

JOSEPH O. BURDETT [II. 99] was born in South Reading, (since Wakefield), Mass., Oct. 30, 1848. His early education was obtained in the public schools of his native town, and he was graduated at Tufts College in 1871. He was supported and educated by his own earnings from the age of twelve years. He taught school at intervals while in college, and during the winter of 1868-69 he taught the Centre Grammar School in Hingham. After graduation he studied law with John W. Hammond, Esq. (afterwards Judge Hammond of the Superior Court), of Cambridge, and in the Harvard Law School. He was admitted to the bar in Middlesex County April 19, 1873, and practised law one year with Mr. -----unreadable line ----- with offices in Hingham and Boston. He was elected a member of the school committee of Hingham in 1876, and chairman of the board in 1880, which office he has held to the present time (1893). He was representative to the General Court from the First Plymouth District in 1884 and 1885, chairman of the Republican State Committee in 1889, and has been re-elected to the same office in 1890 and in 1891.

THOMAS H. BUTTIMER [II. 113] was born in Hingham, March 17, 1868. His early education was in the Hingham public schools. He was fitted for college in the Hingham High School, and after the full course of four years he was graduated at Harvard College in 1890. He studied law in the office of Child & Powers, Boston, and at the Boston University Law School, where he received the degree of LL.B. in 1892. He was admitted to the bar July 26, 1892, and practises his profession with offices in Boston and Hingham.

ABEL CUSHING [II. 161], the son of Abel Cushing, was born in Hingham March 13, 1785. He taught school in Hingham in 1805 and in later years. He was graduated at Brown University in 1810, and studied law with Hon. Ebenezer Gay, in Hingham, afterwards removing to Dorchester, where he practised his profession. He was representative to the General Court from Dorchester for three years, and also a senator from Norfolk County. He was appointed a justice of the Police Court in Boston, which office he held until a short time before his death. He died in Dorchester May 19, 1866.

EBENEZER GAY [II. 266] was the son of Martin and Ruth (Atkins) Gay, and was baptized in Boston Feb. 24, 1771. He was the grandson of Rev. Ebenezer Gay, D. D., so long the minister of the First Parish in Hingham. Mr. Gay was fitted for college at the Boston Latin School, and was graduated at Harvard College in 1789. He studied law in the office of Christopher Gore, who was an eminent statesman of that day, and afterwards governor of Massachusetts. He was admitted to practice at the Court of Common Pleas in 1793, in the County of Suffolk, opened an office in Scollay's Building, where he soon acquired a lucrative practice in a day of small fees. Attracted by early associations he removed to Hingham in 1805, where he opened an office, continuing his office in Boston also for some time after he came here. After the death of his father, in 1809, he gave up his Boston office. Soon after coming to Hingham he was offered by Governor Gore the appointment of judge of the Court of Common Pleas, but declined it, and he continued the practice of his profession here until his death, which occurred Feb. 11, 1842. He was State senator for two successive years, president of the Hingham Bank from its establishment in 1833 until his death, and filled other important offices of trust. His counsel and professional services were much sought by the people of Hingham and other neighboring towns, and his practice was ---unreadable words ---- whose researches lead them to examine transactions here in the earlier years of this century. Many young men studied law in his office, -- among them Abner Loring, Abel Cushing, Jerome Loring John Thaxter, Jacob H. Loud, Solomon Lincoln, Benjamin B. Fessenden, James H. Wilder, James L. Baker, and Ebenezer Gay, Jr. Mr. Gay was a man of decided opinions, fearless in expressing them, and commanded the respect of his clients for his professional abilities.

"He was of that valuable class of the profession who, without possessing the rare gift of eloquence, or the more common talent for the conflicts of the bar, are yet able, by their learning and integrity, to pay the debt which every lawyer justly owes to his profession. His clients, and among them many widows and orphans who resorted to him for advice, always found in him a friend as well as a counsellor. Through life Mr. Gay exhibited a unity of character, which was always marked with usefulness, without ostentation or display. In politics he belonged to the old Federal school, claiming Washington for their model and leader."

EBENEZER GAY (II. 266], the son of Ebenezer and Mary Allyne (Otis) Gay, was born in Hingham March 27, 1818. He was a pupil at Derby Academy in early life, and studied law in the office of his father in Hingham, and at the Harvard Law School, where he received the degree of LL.B. in 1841. He began practice in Hingham, and later opened an office also in Boston. He was a member of the school committee of Hingham, a trustee of Derby Academy, a director in the Hingham Bank, and State senator in 1862. For several years he has held a position in the Suffolk Registry of Probate.

JOHN GILMAN [II. 275] was born in Hingham, England, and was the son of Edward Gilman, who came here from Hingham, in England, in 1638. This family afterwards settled in Exeter. John Gilman probably went to Exeter before 1650, as the earliest mention of his name noticed upon the town records there is an order "by the freemen and some others chosen for ordering the affairs of the town," dated June 19, 1650, signed by him and five others. Nov. 9, 1652, he was again chosen one of the selectmen, and in October, 1653, one of a committee "to carry on the meeting-house." He was elected "townsman " for many years between 1654 and 1678, and probably afterwards. He was commissioner for small causes in 1665, 1666, and 1668. He held many other offices, and was evidently one of the prominent citizens of the place, often chosen or appointed to positions of trust. In 1678 and 1679 he was elected one of the associate judges of the County Court of the old County of Norfolk. He was named, in President Cutt's? Commission in 1679, one of the Council of the Province, and also in Gov. Cranfield's Commission in 1682, and was appointed one of the justices of the Court of Pleas. In 1683, being obnoxious to Gov. Cranfield, he was removed from the Council.

Upon the establishment of the new Provincial government in ---- unreadable line ----- the Assembly, and was speaker of the House, and in 1697 he was again a delegate. He died July 24, 1708.

HENRY EDSON HERSEY [II. 321] was born in Hingham May 28, 1830, and was the son of Capt. Stephen and Maria (Lincoln) Hersey. He gave early indications of a scholarly taste, and after going through the customary course of instruction in the public schools of Hingham, he was fitted for college at the Derby Academy under the charge of Mr. Luther B. Lincoln. He entered the sophomore class of Harvard College in 1847, and was graduated in 1850. His college rank was very high, and at Commencement the salutatory oration was assigned to him. After leaving college he was a private tutor in Charlestown, N. H., studying law at the same time in the office of Hon. Edmund L. Cushing. His professional studies were afterwards continued in Boston in the offices of Hon. Peleg W. Chandler and Judge John P. Putnam. He was admitted to the Suffolk Bar in September, 1854, and at once entered upon the practice of his profession, having offices in Boston and Hingham. He was a member of the school committee of Hingham, one of the trustees of Derby Academy, and for several years superintendent of the First Parish Sunday-school.

In the fall of 1861, when he was just entering upon what promised to be a successful practice, his health began to fail. He sought relief in Spain and the south of France, but after a few months' absence he returned to Hingham, his health not being materially improved. He subsequently spent a few months in New Hampshire, but the slow wasting of consumption continued to exhaust his vital energies, and after returning again to Hingham, he died Feb. 24, 1863.

"He was gentle, quiet, modest, and unobtrusive, yet very social and genial in his nature. He was refined in his tastes, diligent and methodical in his habits, and upright in all his dealings. Strictly conscientious, he aimed, in all the relations of life, to act according to his convictions of duty and right. In everything he undertook he was industrious, painstaking, faithful, -- and he met with that success, that approval and respect, which industry and fidelity will always command. His was a turn of mind eminently calculated to inspire confidence; his manners and habitual deportment were such as would commend any one to favorable regard; and his prevailing spirit was of a cast in which men feel that reliance may be placed. He was discriminating, careful, patient, calm, conciliating, and even-tempered, -- qualifications so essential to one who is to act as an adviser and adininistrator in the affairs of others, sure to be appreciated, and ultimately meet their reward."

SEWALL HENRY HOOPER [II. 352], son of John S. and Maria L. (Barnes) Hooper, was born in Boston, July 29, 1853. His early educations was of obtained in private schools in Boston, and he was graduated at Harvard College in 1875. He studied law at the ??? ----unreadable line ---- was admitted to the bar in Suffolk County, Oct. 15, 1880, soon after which he opened an office in Boston. He is a citizen of Hingham, where he has his residence during a large portion of the year.

ARTHUR LINCOLN [II. 474], the son of Solomon and Mehitable (Lincoln) Lincoln, was born in Hingham, Feb. 16, 1842. He attended private and public schools in Hingham, the Derby Academy, and was fitted for college by his cousin, Henry Edson Hersey, Esq., in Hingham. He was graduated at Harvard College in 1863, and at the Harvard Law School in 1865. Jan. 1, 1866, he entered the law office of Lothrop and Bishop, Boston, having been admitted to the bar June 16, 1865. In January, 1867, he opened an office in Boston, and remained by himself until Nov. 23, 1867, when he became a partner with Lothrop and Bishop, the firm name being Lothrop, Bishop, and Lincoln. He continued a member of this firm until its dissolution in 1879, and since that time he has been in practice by himself, in Boston.

He delivered the Address on Memorial Day in Hingham, in 1876.

He was representative to the General Court, from the First Plymouth District in 1879 and 1880.

July 30, 1877, he was commissioned judge-advocate, with the rank of captain, on the staff of Brigadier-General Eben Sutton, commanding the Second Brigade; M. V. M., and March 3, 1882, resigned and was discharged.

He has been a manager, secretary, and treasurer of the Boston Dispensary; treasurer of the Industrial School for Girls at Dorchester; clerk and treasurer of the Proprietors of the Social Law Library in Boston; trustee of the Derby Academy; trustee and president of the Hingham Public Library; trustee of the Massachusetts State Library; director of the Hingham Mutual Fire Insurance Company; and director and secretary of the Alumni Association of Harvard College.

BENJAMIN LINCOLN [III. 10], son of General Benjamin Lincoln, was born in Hingham, Nov. 1, 1756, and was graduated at Harvard College in 1777. He held a distinguished position in a class containing many men of more than average ability. He studied law with Lieut.-Gov. Levi Lincoln, at Worcester, and commenced practice in Boston. He acquired an honorable reputation at the bar, but the hopes of later distinction which were entertained from his promising beginning were destroyed by his death, at the early age of thirty-two, in 1788.

JOTHAM LINCOLN [II. 456], the son of Jotham and Meriel (Hobart) Lincoln, was born in Hingham, Nov. 7, 1815. He was educated in the public schools of Hingham, and the Derby Academy, under the preceptorship of Mr. Increase S. Smith. Subsequently be attended the private school of Mr. Luther B. Lincoln, and entered the sophomore class of Brown University in 1833, and was graduated in 1836. He studied law in the office of Hon. ----- unreadable line ----- 1839. He spent some time in teaching, and in 1841, when Hon. Solomon Lincoln was appointed United States marshal, he succeeded to his law office in Hingham. In 1847 he was elected a representative to the General Court. After the adjournment of the General Court his bodily health was impaired and his mind diseased. On his recovery he went to Colorado, having a brother in Denver. He located upon a claim which he had taken up about forty miles from Denver, under the shadow of the Rocky Mountains. On Sept. 4, 1868, Mr. Lincoln was binding oats in his field, with another man, when three Indians appeared. His man ran for the house, but Mr. Lincoln would not run. The Indians broke down the fence and rode up to him. One of them attacked him with a sabre and the other two fired upon him, killing him instantly.

Levi Lincoln

LEVI LINCOLN [II. 466] was the son of Enoch and Rachel (Fearing) Lincoln, and was born in Hingham, May 15, 1749. His father was a farmer and a man of decided opinions, frequently appointed on important committees of the town during the Revolution, and a representative to the General Court. He was a man of limited means, and not wishing to give to one of his children advantages he could not offer to all, he placed his son Levi, at the usual age, as an apprentice to an ironsmith. The son soon manifested a love of literary pursuits, and devoted much of his time to the study of Greek and Latin, in which he was assisted by Mr. Joseph Lewis, a teacher for many years in Hingham, and also by Dr. Gay, his minister. With his fondness for books it is not strange that he soon acquired a distaste for his occupation. "His books were his companions day and night. He generally appeared as if in deep thought, and by some was considered reserved and distant in his manners."

He soon abandoned his trade, and after six months' preparation he entered Harvard College, where he was graduated in 1772. After graduation he studied law with Hawley, and commenced practice in Worcester, Mass., in 1775. He rapidly rose to a distinguished position at the bar, and was the acknowledged head of his profession in Worcester County.

He was appointed clerk of the Court of Common Pleas in 1775, and in 1776, judge of probate for Worcester County. In 1781 he was elected a delegate to Congress under the Confederation, and in 1787 he was re-appointed a delegate, but declined the office. In 1797 he was State senator, and in 1800 he was chosen to represent the Worcester district in Congress. He took his seat March 4, 1801, and the next day was appointed, by President Jefferson, attorney-general of the United States. He resigned in 1805. He discharged the duties of secretary of state, under President Jefferson, until the arrival of Mr. Madison in Washington. He had the affection and esteem of Mr. Jefferson in a great degree, and received from him a warm tribute to his character and abilities on leaving the Cabinet. In 1807 Mr. Lincoln was elected lieut.-governor of Massachusetts, and re-elected in 1808, when, in consequence of Governor Sullivan's death, he became acting-governor. In 1810 he was elected a member of the Executive Council of this Commonwealth, and in 1811 he was appointed an associate-justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, which office he declined, and soon after retired to private life.

"He was learned in his profession, and in his addresses to a jury, eloquent, and sometimes irresistible. As a statesman he was fearless and independent, and obtained respect by his energy and decision of character, and not by the practice of any arts to secure popular favor and public admiration."

He died April 14, 1820, and in a review of his character and services a few days after his death was the following:----

"Few of our lawyers and divines are acquainted with the fact that the arbitrary encroachments of the Royalist clergymen, in 1776, were first successfully resisted here (Worcester), and that too by Mr. Lincoln, -- that it probably was his exertions that first defined and settled the often conflicting interests of minister, church, and parish. How few of our rising politicians have been taught that the first practical comment on the introductory clause of the Bill of Rights was first given by a Worcester jury, -- that it was here first shown, by the irresistible eloquence of Lincoln, that 'all men were in truth born free and equal,' and that a court sitting under the authority of our Constitution, could not admit as a justification for all assault, the principle of master and slave, -- that it was the memorable verdict obtained upon this trial which first broke the fetters of negro slavery in Massachusetts and let the oppressed free! This deed of Judge Lincoln, even if it stood alone, ought to consecrate his memory with every freeman."

Solomon Lincoln

SOLOMON LINCOLN [II. 474], the son of Solomon and Lydia (Bates) Lincoln, was born in Hingham, Feb. 28, 1804. After attending private and public schools in Hingham, he was admitted to Derby Academy, Nov. 2, 1813, of which Rev. Daniel Kimball was preceptor. In April, 1819, he left the Academy to pursue a course of classical studies under the tuition of Rev. Joseph Richardson, of Hingham, and in September following, when but fifteen years old, he entered the sophomore class of Brown University, and was graduated there in 1822.

From Oct. 28, 1822, to Nov. 15, 1823, he taught private and public schools in Falmouth, Mass. From Nov. 21, 1823, to Nov. 18, 1826, he studied law in the office of Hon. Ebenezer Gay, of Hingham. Nov. 21, 1826, he was admitted to practice as an attorney at the Court of Common Pleas, in Plymouth, Mass. Oct. 21, 1829, he was admitted as an attorney at the Supreme Judicial Court, in Plymouth; and Oct. 26, 1831, he was admitted as counsellor by the Supreme Judicial Court, in Plymouth. Under the laws then in force three years of study were required for admission to practice in the Court of Common Pleas, two years of practice in that court as preliminary to practice in the Supreme Judicial Court, and two years more of practice before admission as a counsellor-at-law.

He continued in practice as a lawyer in Hingham, with some interruptions, until 1853.

He was elected a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1829, and again in the latter year occupied his seat for a few days only, having been elected to the Massachusetts Senate in the session of that year, by the Legislature, there being no choice by the people. He was also elected to the Senate in 1831, and served through the short session, after which he declined being a candidate. He was also elected representative in 1840.

In December, 1840, he was appointed messenger to carry to Washington the electoral vote of Massachusetts for William Henry Harrison.

March 10, 1841, he was appointed by President Harrison marshal for the District of Massachusetts and entered upon the duties of that office March 18, 1841, serving until December, 1844.

He was a master in chancery for the County of Plymouth, which office he resigned March 10, 1843.

Oct. 2, 1849, he was appointed by Governor Briggs bank-commissioner, -- George S. Boutwell and Joseph S. Cabot being the other commissioners appointed. May 14, 1851, the board having been established on a new basis, Governor Boutwell appointed as bank-commissioners Solomon Lincoln for one year, Peter T. Homer for two years, and Samuel Phillips for three years, and in 1852, Mr. Lincoln was re-appointed for three years. He resigned in 1853, on his election to the office of cashier of the Webster Bank in Boston, after which he gave up the active practice of the law. He continued as cashier of the Webster Bank until 1869, when he was elected its president, which office he held until his resignation in January, 1876, and retirement from active business.

Among the numerous offices which he held and societies of which he was a member were the following:----

Director of the Hingham Mutual Fire Insurance Company, 1833-1864.
President of the same, 1846-1864.
President of the Trustees of the Hingham Public Library, 1869-1874.
    "       "    Hingham Cemetery for many years, resigning in 1881.
    "       "    Trustees of Loring Hall, 1852-1881.
Vice-President of the Hingham Agricultural and Horticultural Society, 1858-1875, and
	President, 1875.
Trustee of Thayer Academy (Braintree) 1872-1881.
Member of the American Antiquarian Society.
  "      "    New England Historic-Genealogical Society.
  "      "    Massachusetts Historical Society.
  "      "    Bunker Hill Monument Association.
Corresponding Member of the Essex Institute, 1857-1881.
Member of Old Colony Lodge of Freemasons, 1827.
Clerk of the First Parish in Hingham, 1829-1834.
Member of the School Committee of Hingham.
   He was nominated for Representative to Congress, but declined the nomination.

His interest in all matters relating to the history of his native town was very great, and at the early age of twenty-three he wrote and published the "History of Hingham." This is the only history of the town which has heretofore been published. The book, although small, contains much valuable information, and is a monument of careful research and accuracy. It was published in 1827. A list of Mr. Lincoln's published writings and addresses appears in the chapter on "Publications," but the following contains also many of his writings not published:----

1826, March 4. Address before the Jefferson Debating Society, Hingham.
1826, July 4. Oration before the Citizens of Hingham.
1827. History of Hingham.
1829, Nov. 24. Address at the Dedication of the Schoolhouse in the Middle Ward,
	Hingham.
1830. Historical Sketch of Nantasket.
1830, July 18. Address before the Sunday School of the First Pariah, Hingham.
1832, Feb. 22. Oration before the Young Men of Plymouth, Mass., on the Centennial
	Anniversary of the birth of George Washington.
1832, March 8. Lecture on "Fisheries " in the House of Representatives, Boston.
	[Repeated before the Boston Society of Natural History, Dec. 11, 1832.]
1833, March 20. Lecture in Hingham, "The Mutual Connection and Dependence of the
	Various Pursuits of Human Life." [Repeated at South Hingham, Jan. 14, 1834.]
1833, Nov. 10. Address before the Sunday School of the First Parish, Hingham.
1835, July 4. Oration before the Citizens of Quincy, Mass.
1835, Sept. 1. Address before the Philermenian Society, Brown University.
1835, Sept 28. Address at the 200th Anniversary of the Settlement of Hingham.
183-. Address before the Plymouth County Agricultural Society.
1846, Sept. 16. Address before the Phi Beta Kappa Society, Brown University.
1865. Notes on the Lincoln Families of Massachusetts.
1867, Sept. 25. Address at the Dedication of the Hall of the Hingham Agricultural and
	Horticultural Society.
1870, June 17. Address at the Dedication of the Soldiers' Monument, Hingham.
1880. Memoir of Rev. Charles Brooks.

Mr. Lincoln always lived in Hingham, where he died Dec. 1, 1881.

SOLOMON LINCOLN [II. 474], the son of Solomon and Mehitable (Lincoln) Lincoln was born in Hingham, Aug. 14, 1838. After attending private schools in Hingham and the Derby Academy, he was fitted for college at the private school of Mr. David B. Tower, in Boston, under the tuition of Mr. Ephraim W. Gurney, subsequently a professor and member of the Corporation of Harvard College. He entered the sophomore class of Harvard College in ----unreadable text -----

In February, 1858, he was appointed a tutor in Harvard College. This position he occupied until July, 1863, having been first a tutor in Greek and Latin, then in Greek, and finally in Mathematics. During the last year of his tutorship he attended the Harvard Law School, and received the degree of LL.B. in 1864.

Jan. 26, 1864, he entered the law office of Stephen B. Ives, Jr., in Salem, Mass. He was admitted to the bar Oct. 20, 1864, and remained in Mr. Ives's office until July, 1865, when he was received by that gentleman as his partner.

The firm of Ives and Lincoln was engaged in business in Salem until Jan. 1, 1867. At that time they opened an office in Boston and continued practice in both places until Feb. 1, 1882, when the firm was dissolved. Mr. George L. Huntress was a partner during, the last four years, the firm name being Ives, Lincoln, and Huntress.

Until 1881 Mr. Lincoln's residence was in Salem. Since that time he has been a resident of Boston. While in Salem he was a member of the School Committee.

Mr. Lincoln was aide-de-camp to Governor Talbot, with the rank of colonel, in 1874, and aid and chief of staff to the same in 1879. He was an overseer of Harvard College from 1882 to 1889; re-elected in 1890, and since 1890 president of the board.

In 1879 he was appointed by Governor Talbot a commissioner to represent Massachusetts at a meeting of the governors of the original thirteen States, at Yorktown, Va. In 1881 he attended the Centennial Celebration at Yorktown, Va., as commissioner, in the suite of Governor Long, who was also one of his college classmates.

He delivered an address at the celebration of the 250th anniversary of the settlement of Hingham, Sept. 15, 1885.

He is a member of the Massachusetts Historical Society, the American Antiquarian Society, and a trustee of Derby Academy.

HENRY M. LISLE [III. 22] studied law in the office of Shearjashub Bourne, in Hingham, and remained here after Mr. Bourne removed to Boston, practising law for five or six years, and then removed to Milton, and finally to Boston. But little is known of him, and there is a tradition that he went to the West Indies. He delivered an oration before the inhabitants of Hingham on the death of Washington, Feb. 22, 1800. His office was at first in Mr. Bourne's old office, on the northeast side of Broad Bridge, and afterwards in Loring's building, on the opposite side.

John D. Long

JOHN D. LONG [III. 25], the son of Zadoc and Julia Temple (Davis) Long, was born in Buckfield, Me., Oct. 27, 1838. His early education was in the common schools of his native town, and at Hebron (Maine) Academy, where he fitted for college.

He was graduated at Harvard College in 1857, with high rank, in a class containing more than the usual number of good scholars. After graduating he was principal of the Westford (Mass.) Academy for two years. He has since been a trustee of that academy, and president of the board of trustees.

In the fall of 1859 he entered the law office of Sidney Bartlett, Esq., in Boston. In the fall of 1860 he entered the Harvard Law School, and remained there until May, 1861. Returning to Maine, he studied law in Buckfield. During that year for a short time he occupied the position of usher in the Boston Latin School. In the spring of 1862 he opened a law office in Buckfield, Me. In the fall of that year he came to Boston and spent the winter in the offices of Peleg W. Chandler and Charles Levi Woodbury. In May, 1863, he went into the office of Stillman B. Allen, Esq., and in 1867 became his partner, the firm name being Allen and Long. This partnership with Mr. Allen continued until Mr. Long became lieut.-governor in 1879. In the summers of 1867 and 1868 he lived in Hingham, and in 1869 he made Hingham his permanent residence. He has been a member of the School Committee, a trustee of Derby Academy, and of the Hingham Public Library.

He was representative to the General Court from the First Plymouth District in 1875, 1876, 1877, and 1878, and during the last three of those years was speaker of the House of Representatives. He was lieut.-governor of Massachusetts in 1879, and governor in 1880, 1881, and 1882. He represented the Second Massachusetts Congressional District in the 48th, 49th, and 50th Congresses, being first elected in 1882.

He is a member of numerous societies and clubs, including the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the New England Historic-Genealogical Society, and many others.

He received the degree of LL.D. from Harvard University in 1880. His publications are enumerated in the chapter on "Publications." His pen has never been idle, and a list of all his numerous orations and addresses would of itself fill a volume. Mr. Long's public life and services are too well known to need any eulogium in this history. In 1889 he resumed the practice of his profession in Boston, returning to an association with his former partners, under the firm name of Allen, Long, and Hemenway.

ABNER LORING [III. 36], son of Peter Loring, was born in Hingham July 21, 1786, and was graduated at Harvard College in 1807. He studied law in the office of Hon. Ebenezer Gay in Hingham, and commenced practice in Dorchester, Mass. Mr. Loring was possessed of an unexceptionable character for fairness and integrity. The hopes of his becoming distinguished in his profession were cut off by his early death, July 18, 1814. His death occurred "when his diligence in the pursuit of knowledge and his integrity and skill in his professional duties had gained universal respect and confidence, and opened the fairest prospect of an honorable and lucrative establishment" in his profession.

JACOB H. LOUD [III. 42] was born in Hingham, Feb. 5. 1802 and was the son of Thomas and Lydia (Hersey) Loud. He fitted for college at the Derby Academy under Rev. Daniel Kimball. He entered Brown University in 1818, and was graduated in ---- unreadable text ---- and was admitted to the bar in 1825. He commenced practice in Plymouth, Mass., Sept. 1, 1825. June 1, 1830, he was appointed register of probate, which office he held until 1852. He was State treasurer from 1853 to 1855, and from 1866 to 1871; representative from Plymouth in 1863, and State senator in 1864 and 1865; president of Old Colony Bank, Plymouth, 1855-1865; president of the Plymouth Savings Bank, 1872-1880; director of the Old Colony Railroad Company; actuary of the New England Trust Company, Boston, 1870-1879. He delivered an oration in Hingham, July 4, 1823. He died in Boston Feb. 2, 1880. Mr. Loud was uniformly courteous in manner, a kind-hearted counsellor, a faithful custodian of private trusts, and a man of rectitude, industry, and conscientious fidelity in all the positions in which he was placed.

JOHN OTIS [III. 102] was born in Hingham in 1657. He moved to Barnstable in 1686, where he died Sept. 23, 1727. He was a distinguished lawyer, for eighteen years a colonel of militia, twenty years representative, twenty-one years a member of the council, and for thirteen years chief justice of the Court of Common Pleas and judge of probate.

He was the father of James Otis, and grandfather of James Otis "the patriot," both well known in connection with the history of the country.

BENJAMIN PRATT [III. 116], son of Aaron Pratt, was born March 13, 1710-11, in that part of Hingham now included within the limits of Cohasset. He was graduated it Harvard College in 1737. He studied law with Auchmuty or Gridley, or both, and commenced practice in Boston. For several years he was one of the Boston representatives in the General Court, and was fearless and independent in support of those measures he thought to be just. He was a man of strong intellect and decided traits of character, qualities which made him conspicuous at the bar. He gained the friendship of Governor Pownal, and by his influence was appointed chief justice of the Supreme Court of New York. On the occasion of his separation from the Suffolk Bar, the members sent him an address, which spoke in affectionate terms of his worth as a man and a lawyer.

Chief Justice Pratt hoped to spend the closing years of his life in New England, for he was possessed of all the pride of being a New Fngland man, but death came to him ere he realized this fond anticipation. He died in New York Jan. 5, 1763.

His talents were unquestioned. He was a man of great learning, and wrote much in prose and poetry in a classical and scholarly style. He made an extensive collection of rare documents relating to the history of New England, and hoped to write its history, but that hope he did not live to see fulfilled.

EDWARD B. PRATT, son of Samuel L. and Mary L. (Bigley) Pratt, was born in Boston, Dec. 22, 1866. The family moved to Hingham in 1879. He attended the public schools, and was fitted four years at Harvard College, where he was graduated in 1888; studied law in the office of Richardson & Hale, Boston, and at the Boston University Law School, where he received the degree of LL.B. in 1891; was admitted to the bar Jan. 17, 1891, and has offices in Hingham and Boston.

DAVID THAXTER [III. 237] was the son of Joseph B. and Sally (Gill) Thaxter, and was born in Hingham March 24, 1824. He was educated in the schools of this town, and learned the trade of a silversmith in his father's shop; but pursued his studies, partly under the tuition of Preceptor Luther B. Lincoln, and afterwards at the Harvard Law School. He obtained his legal education by his own exertions, and with the aid of his brothers, and entered the office of Sidney Bartlett, Esq., the eminent lawyer of Boston. His office was in connection with Mr. Bartlett's during his entire professional career, until his death, which occurred June 10, 1878. Mr. Thaxter never sought or held public office. His life was unostentatious and somewhat retired. His reading was extensive and varied, and he was a man of broad and liberal views. In professional ability and character he commanded the entire respect of the members of the bar, and had the confidence of his clients as a barrister of perfect integrity.

JOHN THAXTER [III. 233] was born in Hingham July 6, 1755, and was graduated at Harvard College in 1774. He studied law with (President) John Adams, in Braintree, and in 1776 was appointed deputy secretary to Congress. Afterwards, in the absence of Mr. Thompson, he performed the duties of secretary. In 1779, when Mr. Adams was appointed minister to make a treaty of peace with Great Britain, Mr. Thaxter went with him to Europe, as his private secretary, and with Mr. Adams resided in France and Holland. His integrity and fidelity won for him the greatest confidence of Mr. Adams. After peace was confirmed in 1783, the commissioners sent him to America with the charge of presenting the definitive treaty to Congress.

In 1784 he commenced the practice of law in Haverhill, Mass., where he died at an early age.

"As a lawyer, Mr. Thaxter was eminently respected for those qualifications the want of which, in some of the profession, has brought a degree of odium upon the whole 'order.' A nervous system, too delicate by nature to withstand the imperious taunts of overbearing arrogance, and still more debilitated by disease, disappointed the expectations which his strong, manly style of sentiment had created, and unhappily rendered him less useful as an advocate at the bar than as a counsellor in his chamber. But he was rich in the less glaring virtues, -- honor, integrity, fidelity, and love of peace. These gained him the esteem and confidence of all."

JOHN THAXTER [III. 235] was the son of Quincy Thaxter, and was born in Hingham Nov. 4, 1793. He was graduated from Harvard College in 1814, ---unreadable text--- in the office of Hon. Ebenezer Gay, ---unreadable text.---