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MONTOUR COUNTY, PA BIOGRAPHIES

DANVILLE TOWNSHIP

From "The History of Columbia and Mountour Counties"
Battle, 1887


 
ROBERT ADAMS, of the firm of Conkling & Co., dealers in all kinds of books and stationery, and agents for the Adams Express Company, Danville, was born in Farrandsville, Penn., May 22, 1838, a son of Robert and Hester (JODON) ADAMS. His parents were natives of Pennsylvania and of Irish origin. The father was a boot and shoe manufacturer. Robert is the youngest in a family of five children, and grew to manhood in Danville; was educated at the Danville Academy and graduated in 1856. Except the time spent in school he has been with Mr. CONKLING since he was eleven years of age, first being employed with him as a boy in the store, then as clerk, and later bought a partial interest in the business. In 1866 Mr. CONKLING took him in as full partner, and their relationship has since existed without a word of discord. Mr. ADAMS has been connected with the Adams Express Company at Danville since 1854. The firm own their store room, and have fitted it up especially for their business, and also own the room for the express office. Mr. ADAMS is a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 141)

WILLIAM AMESBURY, coal merchant, Church Street, Danville, was born in England November 26, 1825, a son of Richard and Harriet (PERNELL) AMESBURY. He is the second in a family of seven children, and at the age of eight years ran away from home rather than attend school. He first obtained employment where a railroad was being built, making himself useful by carrying tools, etc., and was soon the pet of the workmen. He earned twenty-five cents a day, which gave him an ample supply of money for his wants, and thus employed remained until he was twelve years old. He then went to Scotland and worked with railroad men two years, at the end of which time he returned to England and began to work in the mines at Yorkshire. There he remained until the age of twenty-two, when he came to America; remained a short time in New York, and then came to Danville, where he was employed in the iron mines one year. He then went to St. Louis, Mo., where he engaged with a company to travel in search of lead and copper mines, which he made his employment for some time, and during which period made several important discoveries. He traveled extensively in that business, has been in all the States and Territories in South America, Canada, England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales, and has crossed the ocean from America to England three times. He carried on mining, employing from forty to fifty men, and, although his education is limited, he was his own bookkeeper and kept all his accounts. He married, in 1854, Miss Maria, daughter of Richard COOK and of English origin. Five children blessed their union: William, Mary (wife of Thomas CROMWELL), Adaline, Jennie and Arthur. Mr. and Mrs. AMESBURY are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Politically he is independent. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 141)

W. H. AMMERMAN, insurance agent, Danville, was born in Northumberland County, Penn., November 19, 1834, a son of Robert S. (a farmer) and Margaret (JOHNSON) AMMERMAN, natives of Pennsylvania, and of Scotch descent, who had a family of seven children, W. H. being second. Our subject received his education in his native county, chose farming as his occupation, and followed it until the age of twenty-three. He then obtained a certificate, and taught school several years, after which he accepted a position as agent for The Farmer's Mutual Fire Insurance Company of Middle Pennsylvania, and was sent to Lycoming County, Penn., where he carried on the business for twelve years, and still represents it at Danville. The available collateral assets of this company, July 15, 1886, were $269,128.48, and the company is now in a flourishing condition. During that time he had his home at Danville, and when, in 1871, the Danville Mutual Fire Insurance Company was organized, he was elected its secretary, which position he still holds. In 1867 he formed a partnership with Patterson JOHNSON, and the firm did a general insurance business for eighteen years, until the death of Mr. JOHNSON in 1883. The latter had been secretary of the Farmers Mutual Insurance Company of Middle Pennsylvania, and, upon his death, that company prevailed upon our subject to take the position and look after their interests until the election. When they met they elected Mr. AMMERMAN secretary, and he has since increased the capital stock of the company. He was actively engaged for a time, and is associated with David R. WILLIAMS, of Danville, in the general fire insurance business. These gentlemen are careful business men and represent none but first-class companies, such as the following: AEtna of Hartford, Conn.; Fire Association of Philadelphia; Germania, of New York City; Girard, of Philadelphia; Imperial, of London, England; Lancashire, of Manchester, England; Phoenix, of Hartford, Conn.; Royal, of Liverpool, England. Mr. AMMERMAN has had a long experience in the insurance business, for which his qualifications eminently fit him, and to which the high rank he now occupies among leading insurance men is due. He has been twice married; first, November 26, 1864, to Mary J. ROGERS, who bore him six children and died in 1875. She was a member of the Episcopal Church, and of English origin. His second marriage took place February 6, 1879, with Wilhamina MORGAN. Mr. AMMERMAN has served as a member of the school board of Danville, is a member of the I. O. O. F., and also of the Masonic fraternity. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 141)

Caleb APPLEMAN, retired farmer, Danville, was born in Columbia County, Penn., April 12, 1812, a son of Boltis and Mary Melick APPLEMAN, natives of Pennsylvania and of German and Dutch descent. He is the sixth in a family of eight children and was educated in Bloomsburg. He came to Montour County in 1832, where he followed farming which he made financially successful, and retired in 1885, making his residence in Danville. His grandfather, Peter MELICK, was a soldier in the Revolution and his father was a soldier in the war of 1812. In 1831 Caleb married Mary M., a daughter of Henry RISHEL, of German origin, and ten children were born to them, viz.: Elmira, deceased wife of John CARR; Sally Ann, wife of Charles A. RENTZ; Agnes, wife of James M. VAN DEVENDER; Mary E., wife of John C. PATTERSON, of Danville; Margaret J., wife of Hon. Jesse C. AMERMAN, a prominent farmer; Amos B.; Harriet, wife of Peter E. RENTZ; Eli, a farmer; Caroline, wife of George GILMORE, and Franklin Pierce. Mrs. APPLEMAN united with the Lutheran Church at Milton when she was about nineteen years old. Mr. APPLEMAN is a member of the Episcopal Church. He was a member of the building committee when the Methodist Church in Valley Township, Montour County, was erected and was Sabbath-school superintendent there for ten years. He was school director for six years. He is a Democrat and served twenty-seven years as constable. His son Amos was in the civil war, a member of the One Hundred and Thirty-second Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 142)

GEORGE W. ASKINS, merchant, Danville, was born in Landisburg, Perry County, Penn., April 14, 1829, to Samuel (a shoemaker) and Susannah (FITZCHARLES) ASKINS, natives also of Pennsylvania, and of Scotch-Irish descent, the former of whom died in Union County, Penn. Their family consisted of nine children, four of whom grew to adult age. Our subject, the eldest child, was reared and educated in his native county until sixteen years of age. He then went to Harrisburg where he learned the tinner's trade, serving a regular apprenticeship, and after completing his apprenticeship he obtained a situation at Selin's Grove, Snyder Co., Penn. There he worked at his trade and subsequently clerked in a general store until 1877, when he came Danville and superintended a stove and tinware store for the firm of Waterman & Beaver, where he was employed for seven years. At the expiration of that time he bought out the firm, and has since continued the business with marked success. He is now the owner of the store and business room, and also of a neat and substantial residence. He married in 1853, Elizabeth MONBECK, a lady of German origin, daughter of David MONBECK, a farmer of Union county, Penn. Mrs. ASKINS is the mother of seven children: Mary, wife of R. PIERCE; William, in business with his father; Emma, at home; Charles; Harry, a tinner; Florence and Jessie. Mr. ASKINS is one of the commissioners of Montour County. He enlisted in the Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, served one year and was discharged at the close of the war. He is a member of the G. A. R. of Danville; in politics a Republican. Mrs. ASKINS is a member of the Lutheran Church. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 142)

WILLIAM B. BALDY, editor of the Montour American, Danville, was born in that place, August 5, 1853, a son of Charles C. and Mercy Jane (BOTHWELL) BALDY, whose ancestors were among the early German and Scotch settlers of Pennsylvania. His parents were born in that State, and his father was a carriage manufacturer in Danville in the early part of his life, but later carried on a hardware store in the same place. He was twice married and his family consisted of ten children, five of whom are now living. Our subject is the fifth child by the first wife. He attended the schools of Danville and Andalusia College, in Bucks County, Penn., and also Lehigh University, where he graduated in civil engineering, class of 1876. He then commenced to learn the printer's art in the office of the Montour American, and two years later bought one-half interest in the paper, the firm being Bradley & Baldy until April 1, 1883. Since that time Mr. BALDY has been editor and proprietor of the Montour American, which is Republican in political sentiment, and has a good circulation. He is chairman of the Republican county committee; is an active member of Friendship Fire Company of Danville, and has been its secretary for eight years; is a member of the R. A. of Danville, and is its Regent; is Past Noble Grand of the I. O. O. F., and also a member of the encampment; and captain of Company F, Twelfth Regiment Pennsylvania National Guards. In 1881 Mr. BALDY married Ida B., daughter of William WATERS, and a native of Pennsylvania of German origin. They have one child, Isabella May. He and his wife are members of the Protestant Episcopal Church, of which he is a vestryman and tresaurer of the board, also Sunday-school superintendent. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 142)

JONATHAN P. BARE, justice of the peace, Danville, was born in Montgomery County, September 8, 1841, a son of Frederick and Susan (PLACE) BARE, natives of Pennsylvania and of German and French origin, respectively. In early life the father was a shoemaker, later a farmer, and died in 1849. Jonathan P. is the eldest son in a family of five children, and was reared by A. HENDRICKS on a farm in Montgomery County until 1857, when he came to Montour County, which has since been his home, except the time he spent in the service of his country. He enlisted in 1861 in the artillery, One Hundred and Twelfth Regiment of the line, and was elected orderly sergeant of Company F, served three years and was in several battles. In 1864 he returned home and worked on the Catawissa Railroad, and subsequently farmed for a time. He again worked on the railroad as a bridge-builder until September 24, 1870, when he met with a sad accident which deprived him of both feet. Politically he is a Republican, and in 1879 was elected justice of the peace, which office he still holds, and is also treasurer of the board of directors of the poor of Danville and Mahoning Township. He is a member of the G. A. R. and of the I. O. O. F. also of the I. O. O. F. Encampment. His first wife died in 1867, and in 1870 he married his second wife, a lady of German origin, who has borne him three children: William A., Harry Clayton and Sarah Gertrude. Mr. and Mrs. BARE are members of the German Reformed Church. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 143)

JESSE BEAVER, retired merchant, Danville, was born in Lebanon County, Penn., March 8, 1811, a son of Peter (a tanner and Methodist minister) and Elizabeth (GILBERT) BEAVER, whose ancestors were among the early settlers of Pennsylvania. (For further ancestral history see sketch of Thomas BEAVER.) They were the parents of twelve children, ten of whom attained adult age. Jesse, who is the fifth child, received his education in a log schoolhouse in Perry County, Penn. Early in life he learned the printers' trade, but never worked at it after completing his apprenticeship. He clerked two years in a store in Union County, where his father had moved in 1828, and then returned to Perry County, and engaged in keeping a general store until 1857. He then sold out and bought a store in Union County, where he continued the business until 1863. In that year he came to Danville and engaged for some years in the coal trade, after which he retired. In 1833 he married Mary Ann, daughter of Dr. Christian SWARTZ, a native of Pennsylvania and of Pennsylvania-Dutch descent. Their union was blessed with five sons and five daughters, all of whom are living and married, except one. Mr. and Mrs. BEAVER are members of the Methodist Church, of which he has been steward, trustee and class-leader. He has been a constant reader, and devotes much time to the study of the Scriptures, ancient and modern history, etc. In politics he was a Democrat until 1856, when he affiliated with the Republican party, to which he still adheres. He held several offices while a resident of Perry and Union Counties, such as school director and member of the town council, and served one term as auditor of Perry County. He was postmaster at Millerstown, and was appointed collector of toll for the Pennsylvania Canal Company, but on finding that he was usurping another man's place he refused to accept the position. Mr. BEAVER then purchased a store, which he conducted until coming to Danville in 1863. He was elected associate judge of Perry County in 1851, and served five years; also served one term as representative. In 1862 he was appointed United States revenue collector of Union County, serving until he came to Danville, when he resigned and embarked in the coal and lumber business. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 143)

THOMAS BEAVER came to Danville for his permanent home in 1857. To his hands, among others, had been entrusted the affairs of the Montour Iron and Steel Works, that had just previously suffered from the financial panic that at that time was passing over our country. Mr. WATERMAN, as co-trustee with Mr. BEAVER, retained his residence in Philadelphia, hence the immediate responsibility rested mostly on Mr. BEAVER. He soon had the entire works in successful operation, and in 1860 Messrs. WATERMAN and BEAVER purchased the entire concern, which soon became one of the most extensive iron manufacturing plants in the country. In another chapter, to which the reader is referred, is some extent the account of Mr. BEAVER's enterprise and business sagacity. Thomas BEAVER was born November 16, 1814, in Pfouty's Valley (now in Perry County), Penn., a son of Rev. Peter and Elizabeth (GILBERT) BEAVER. His ancestors on the paternal side emigrated from Germany about the beginning of 1741, and settled in Chester County, Penn. The family name of his grandmother BEAVER was KEIFER, of whom there are now residents in Franklin County, this state. This family immigrated to this country in 1755, and first settled in Lebanon County. The father of our subject, Rev. Peter BEAVER, born December 25, 1782, in Franklin County, Penn., was ordained in 1809 at Elkton, Md., by Bishop ASBURY, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was actively engaged in the ministry many years; he died in August, 1849. Thomas' mother died in 1818; she was Elizabeth (GILBERT) BEAVER, the daughter of grandfather GILBERT, who was born in Germany, but was of English descent, his father having been a English soldier and one of Marlborough's men in the battle of Blenheim, and from that country immigrated to America. The GILBERTs located in Lebanon County, where they resided many years, but later moved to Dauphin County. They are a large family and are farmers. The issue of the marriage of Rev. Peter and Elizabeth (GILBERT) BEAVER is as follows: George, who married Catharine LONG; Samuel, who married Maria LEMAN; Jacob, who married Ann Eliza ADDAMS (one of whose children is a favorite son of Pennsylvania, Gen. James ADDAMS BEAVER, of Centre County, a gallant soldier and Christian gentleman); Jesse, who married Mary Ann SCHWARTZ; Thomas, whose name heads this sketch; Peter, who married Eliza G. SIMINTON; Sarah, who married Aaron NEVIUS; Eliza; Catharine, who married Archibald GREENLEE, and Mary, who married Henry HILLER, now of Lewisburg. Thomas BEAVER's educational advantages were rather meagre. He never attended school after his thirteenth year, but as he possessed an indomitable will and innate intellectual force, his after success was none the less positive because of the lack of scholastic education in early youth. In April, 1827, he left the parental roof in search of his fortune, and for a number of months worked on a farm at $2.50 per month, and in the winter of that year entered the store of BEAVER & BLACK (his brother Samuel and Judge BLACK), at Milford. The following spring the business was removed to Newport, Perry County, and there he continued one year. His father having in the meantime opened a store at New Berlin, Union County, Thomas put in a year's work there, and then returned to Newport to take charge of the business of Judge BLACK, who was a prominent politician and spent most of his time outside. Close application to business brought its frequent attendant, and illness compelled a climatic change, so through the friendly aid of Gen. MITCHELL, chief of construction of the Pennsylvania Canal, on November 1, 1831, he went to Williamsport to fill an engagement in the general store of Rev. Jasper BENNETT. His knowledge of goods and force of character were demonstrated at that early day, he being sent, when but eighteen years of age, to Philadelphia to purchase a stock of goods, making the tedious journey by stage-coach. In 1833 he formed a connection with Peter NEVIUS in general merchandising at Lewisburg, and remained until 1835, when he sold out his interest and a WILLIAM BIDDLE (deceased), for many years a prominent merchant and manufacturer, of Danville, was a man of more than ordinary intelligence and executive ability. He was born at White Hall, then in Columbia County, now in Montour, April 18, 1812. His parents, Gershom and Mary (JENNINGS) BIDDLE, had a family of six sons and four daughters, he being the youngest. They were charter members of the Old Derry Presbyterian Church, that was organized in 1798. Gershom BIDDLE was a prominent man of Derry Township, of Scotch-Irish descent; his ancestors were among the early pioneers of Pennsylvania, settling on a tract of land near Fishing creek, Northumberland County, surveyed on application to the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and purchased April 13, 1769. Mary (JENNINGS) BIDDLE, wife of Gershom, was a daughter of Hugh JENNINGS, who served in the Revolutionary war; he was of English descent; his ancestors settled in New Jersey near Morristown. William BIDDLE at the age of thirteen came to Danville, was employed as clerk by the late John MOORE, merchant; subsequently became a partner; a few years later engaged with him and others in the foundry business. After many changes among the partners he became the owner of the Eagle Works, on Ferry Street, which for a number of years was one of the leading industries of Danville, and gave employment to over 100 men. Mr. BIDDLE always took an active interest in the welfare of those in his employ, and by his kindness and generosity gained their confidence and respect--a truly honest man. He was married twice; his first wife was Mary Jane MOORE, daughter of John and Elizabeth (DONALDSON) MOORE; she died December 12, 1854, and was the mother of seven sons and two daughters, two sons living, viz.: Edward Moore BIDDLE, residing in Danville, and Walter Sterling BIDDLE, in Wilkesbarre, both married, each having one son, Edward Percy and Charles Hamrick. His second wife, Anne Alward MOORE (sister of his former wife), he married December 6, 1860. The fruit of this union was three children: Grace Hunter, Harry Otis and Horace Moore, bookkeeping in the First National Bank, Danville. William BIDDLE was identified with Danville for sixty years, and died February 3, 1885, being one of the oldest citizens of Danville, and respected by all who knew him. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 144)

HORACE C. BLUE, dealer in groceries, tobaccos, cigars, flour and feed, Danville, was born in that place October 13, 1857, a son of Samuel (a painter) and Abigail (HULLIGHEN) BLUE, natives of Pennsylvania and of Scotch and Irish origin. They had a family of six children, five of whom grew to adult age. Our subject, the youngest of the family, was educated in the schools of his native town. At the age of twelve he began clerking in a store, and at seventeen embarked in business for himself, keeping a flour and feed store. He has been very successful and is now one of the representative business men of Danville, having become such by his own exertions. He is a Democrat, and takes a lively interest in politics. In 1884, he married Miss Stella Scott BEAVER, daughter of Thomas W. BEAVER, and of English origin. They have one child, Isabel. Mrs. BLUE is a member of the Presbyterian Church of Danville. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 145)

DANIEL MONTGOMERY BOYD was born in Rush Township, Northumberland Co., Penn., within two miles of Danville on the "homestead farm." He is the son of John C. and Hannah M. BOYD. The former was a native of Chester County, Penn., and a son of Gen. John BOYD. He was a large owner of real estate, a prominent and active business man, and foremost in all the public enterprises of his day. His mother was a native of Danville, and daughter of Gen. Daniel Montgomery; both parents were of Scotch-Irish descent. Daniel Montgomery is the second in a family of eight children, seven of whom grew to maturity and attained prominence in business and social life of their native place. D. Montgomery BOYD acquired his education principally at the "Danville Academy," an institution founded and sustained largely by the liberality of Gen. William MONTGOMERY (one of his ancestors) and which held a prominent position in the educational institutions of its day, being thoroughly equipped and conducted by the best teachers. After completing his education and spending a year or two at his home in the country, he went with his father and family to Pottsville, Penn., where he, for a short time, engaged in the purchase and sale of coal. Soon after he became identified with the development of the Shamokin coal basin, in opening mines and building railroads. Becoming interested personally in coal lands, he with a partner opened one of the finest veins of coal and built one of the first improved coal breakers in that country; afterward became interested in mining and selling the same. In 1862 he was induced to go to Havre-de-Grace, Md., for the purpose of selling and shipping coal by vessel south, but later extended his operations with others to shipment of coal to points south and west. He remained here until 1881, when ill health forced him to retire from active business. He returned to Danville, where he became interested in the leading enterprises of the place, being president of the First National Bank, Danville, Penn., president of the board of trustees of the State Insane Hospital, president of the Nail Manufacturing Company, and other interests. He has always been willing to assist with his labor, influence and money, every public enterprise of Danville, and is one of the few who enjoy the fruits of his labor. He married in 1869, Miss Caroline A. BOCKINS, of Germantown, Penn., who died in 1876. His second marriage took place in 1878, with Miss Ida COTTRELL, of Columbia, Penn., who has borne him two children: Daniel Montgomery (deceased) and Elsie M. Mr. BOYD and family are members of the Presbyterian Church, of which he is a trustee. His politics are Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 145)

HON. DENNIS BRIGHT was born at the homestead in Valley Township, Montour (then Columbia) Co., Penn., March 22, 1839, the third child of Peter and Mary BRIGHT that grew to the age of maturity. His father, Peter BRIGHT, was born in Reading in 1801; his father, David BRIGHT, was born in Reading in 1771; his father Michael BRIGHT, was born in Lebanon county, and his grandfather, Michael BRIGHT immigrated to this country from the Palatinate in 1756; being of French or German origin. At that time there were but three counties in the province of Pennsylvania--Philadelphia, Bucks and Chester. Schaefferstown was in Chester County, and one of the oldest towns in the State, and the elder BRIGHT settled there when but twenty years of age. Our subject received an academic education, graduating from Pittsburgh Commercial College in 1856; he worked on his father's farm until the spring of 1861. He was in Indiana at the breaking out of the Rebellion, and on April 20, 1861, enlisted under the call for three months men: many more enlisted, however, than were needed to fill the Indiana quota, and his regiment was one of the number left out; they were, however, held in Indianapolis by Gov. Morton, in expectation of another call, and when the call for three years' men came, he was mustered into the United States service June 14, 1861, as first sergeant of Company A, Fifteenth Regiment Indiana Volunteers. The regiment, being already equipped and drilled, was immediately sent to the front, and took part in one of the first engagements of the war, fought at Rich Mountain, W. Va. After the retreat of the rebels the regiment was ordered in pursuit, and at a stand made by them at Elk Water, he was wounded by a musket-ball passing through his ankle, this preventing his doing active duty until the following spring, when he was ordered to join his command, with rank of captain, to serve on staff of Brig. Gen. George D. Wagner, having been successively promoted from first sergeant. His brigade had been transferred from Virginia to Kentucky to join the army of Gen. Buell, for the investment of Fort Henry and Fort Donelson. After participating in the capture of these forts the brigade joined the army of Gen. Grant, in Tennessee, and at the battle of Pittsburg Landing, Mr. BRIGHT received injuries to his wounded ankle which incapacitated him from further active service; he was detailed on garrison and provost duty, and after having served for two years, was discharged. After his return from the army he was appointed by the Government an assessor of internal revenue, and by Gov. Geary was appointed lieutenant-colonel Eighth Division National Guard of Pennsylvania. He has resided in Danville since the war, engaged in various vocations and is now in the hardware trade. In 1872 he represented this county in the State Legislature, being the first Republican holding that office from Montour County. He was married in 1872 to Lucy M. REAY. She was a native of England and a resident of San Francisco, to which place she removed with her relatives in childhood. Mr. BRIGHT's maternal ancestors were of Welsh origin, and settlers in Chester County, Penn., in 1730. Mr. and Mrs. BRIGHT have no children. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 145)

G. B. BROWN, merchant, Danville, was born in Columbia (now Montour) County, Penn., September 13, 1816, a son of Samuel and Dorothy (NEICE) BROWN, natives, respectively of England and Holland. The father was brought to America when a small child, by his parents, who settled in Columbia (now Montour) County in 1736. Subject's father and grandfather were both farmers, and both died in Columbia County, Penn. The grandparent was a prominent man, and served as magistrate many years, and in those early times a magistrate was a man of no small amount of authority. George B. is the eighth of nine children (all of whom grew to maturity), and was nine years of age when his father died. He remained with his mother on the farm until he was fourteen, meanwhile attending the district school, and then worked out on the farm until he was seventeen years old. He then clerked in a store in Mifflinville, Columbia County, until 1834. In that year he came to Danville and clerked for two years in a dry goods store, and later purchased the store of S. M. BOWMAN & Co., and conducted it four years, when he was sold out by the sheriff. His failure seems to have given him renewed energy, for he embarked in everything in which he could see an honest dollar, and at one time was operating nine different enterprises in Danville. In this way he paid off all back debts. the man who, in order to show a clear record and enjoy a peaceful conscience, will honor claims for which he is no longer legally responsible, must surely be an "honest man." He first opened a boarding house, to which he later added livery business; then studied dentistry, opened an office and practiced with success, and was among the most active business men of Danville. In 1856 he established his present business, dealing in books, stationery, artists' supplies, etc., and to him belongs the honor of circulating the first daily newspaper in Danville, a branch of his business which has steadily expanded. In 1837 he married Sarah A., daughter of John GEARHART, and of German origin. Four children have been born to them: Benton, Melissa D., John G. and Will G. Mr. and Mrs. BROWN are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of the building committee, of which he was a member. He is Republican in politics; has served twenty-one years as treasurer of the school board of Danville, and has been a member of the town council and burgess one term. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 146)

HON. THOMAS CHALFANT is descended on the paternal side from Robert CHALFANT, a member of the Society of Friends, who emigrated with William Penn from Stoke Pogis, England, and settled on a patent of land at Doe Run, Chester Co., Penn., which land is still in the family name. On the maternal side his ancestor is John PEDEN, a Scotch-Irish Covenanter, who immigrated to Pennsylvania in 1732, and was one of the first to found a Covenanter Church in Philadelphia, on Spruce Street, above Third. The subject of this sketch was born in Philadelphia, in the year 1819, and was brought up in that city. He learned the carpentering and pattern-making trades and worked thereat for some years. In 1847 he removed to Georgia, and was there engaged in the erection of sugar-mills, cotton-mills, and structures of a similar character. Subsequently he returned to the North and located at Danville, Penn., where he entered into partnership with his brother-in-law, Dr. Isaac HUGHES, in the drug business. October 1, 1853, he was commissioned postmaster at Danville. He held this position until July 15, 1861, when he assumed charge of the Danville Intelligencer, which he has conducted from that time to the present. June 28, 1863, Mr. CHALFANT entered the military service of the United States, and was commissioned captain of Company D, Fifty-third Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers. He was mustered out on August 19, 1863. October 8, 1866, Mr. CHALFANT was elected a member of the State Legislature, as representative from the counties of Columbia and Montour. He was re-elected in 1867. During his incumbency of that office he was an active and highly esteemed member of the General Assembly, and was largely instrumental in the passage of a bill appointing commissioners to select a site for and erect a State hospital for the insane. The selection of Danville as the site for the hospital was also largely due to his efforts. In 1883 Mr. CHALFANT was appointed one of the trustees of the Danville Hospital, a position he yet holds through two subsequent re-appointments. In 1870 he was again chosen State senator, representing the counties of Columbia, Montour, Lycoming and Sullivan in the State senate, and served three years in that capacity. In 1842 Mr. CHALFANT was united in marriage with Eliza V. HUGHES, daughter of Ellis HUGHES, Esq., of Danville. The offspring of this marriage were two sons and two daughters, of whom none survive but the younger son, Charles, publisher of the Danville Daily Sun. In 1881 Mr. CHALFANT was elected president of the Pennsylvania State Editorial Association. He is at present postmaster at Danville, a position to which he was commissioned by President Cleveland in 1885. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 146)

B. A. CHILDS, merchant, Danville, was born in Valley Township, Montour (then Columbia) County, Penn., November 21, 1829, a son of James and Rachel (APPLEMAN) CHILDS, of German and Irish origin, respectively, whose ancestors were among the early settlers of Pennsylvania; the father, a farmer, was twice married. Our subject, the third of six children born to the first wife, was reared on the farm and attended school in his native township, and from his youth up was engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1854. He then moved to Danville, and was employed in the rolling-mills until 1880, when he obtained work in a stove and tinware store, and was employed in the mechanical department until 1885, when he embarked in business of a similar character for himself, and has met with success. He married, in Montour County, in 1853, Sarah, daughter of Robert RICHART, whose parents were natives, respectively, of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, and of English origin. Mr. and Mrs. CHILDS are the parents of two children: J. R. and Emily. Mr. and Mrs. CHILDS are members of the Methodist Church, of Danville. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 147)

DAVID CLARK, cashier of the Danville National Bank, was born in Pennsylvania, January 31, 1814, a son of John and Jane (CLARK) CLARK (no relation). Both his paternal and maternal ancestors were early settlers of Pennsylvania. His father was a saddler by trade, and his family consisted of seven children, of whom David is the youngest and the only one now living. He received his education in the common schools, and began life for himself by clerking in a store for a few years. He then embarked in the mercantile trade, keeping a general store until 1845, when he was elected justice of the peace. In 1850 he came to Danville, and clerked in the Danville bank, which institution he has served as cashier since 1864. He has been burgess of Danville; is a director of the nail works; politically he is a Republican. He has two children now living: Cordelia (wife of George M. GEARHART) and Mary (wife of William C. FRICK). (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 147)

JOSHUA WRIGHT COMLY, attorney at law, Danville, was born at Philadelphia, Penn., November 16, 1810, a son of Charles and Sarah (WRIGHT) COMLY. The father was a native of Pennsylvania, died January 9, 1840; the mother was born in New Jersey, and died March 4, 1879. They were married February 19, 1807, and eight children were born to them, six of whom arrived at maturity, but all are now deceased, except our subject and his brother. Joshua W. was reared in the Quaker faith, attended the schools of his neighborhood, and also Princeton College. In 1827 he began the study of law at Milton, Northumberland Co., Penn, in the office of Samuel HEPBURN, Esq., and three years later, November 17, 1830, was admitted to the court of common pleas of Northumberland County. In 1833 he was admitted to the supreme court of Pennsylvania, and has made law the business of his life. He practiced in three counties for many years, traveled and did a large practice in several other counties. In 1851 he was the Whig candidate for judge of the supreme court, and in May, 1882, retired. He is descendant of Henry and Joan COMLY, who with their son, Henry, came to America with William Penn. They were members of the Society of Friends. Henry, was a weaver by trade, settled in Bucks County, Penn. Charles COMLY (subject's father) is the son of Ezra COMLY, formerly of Philadelphia, and Hannah Iredel, his wife. Ezra was a son of Robert COMLY, late of Byberry, Philadelphia, and Sarah JONES, his wife. Robert COMLY was the son of Robert COMLY, Sr., and Jane CADWALLADER, his wife. Robert COMLY, Sr., was the second son of Henry COMLY of Bucks County, Penn., and Agnes HESTON, his wife. Henry COMLY was the son of Henry COMLY, Sr., and Jane his wife, who came from England to Pennsylvania in 1682. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 147)

E. W. CONKLING, senior member of the firm of CONKLING & Co., Danville, was born in New Jersey, August 2, 1819, a son of Isaac and Sarah (HALL) CONKLING, natives of New Jersey and of English descent. The father was a manufacturer, and his family consisted of four children, three of whom grew to maturity. E. W., the eldest child, at the age of sixteen entered Princeton College, from which he graduated in 1838. His first business was teaching, which he followed for seven years mostly in Danville Academy. He then went to New Jersey and taught school for two years, and, subsequently returning to Danville, was appointed county superintendent of public schools of Montour County, which position he held until 1849. He then embarked in the book and stationery business, which he has since continued. Mr. CONKLING has also been agent of the Howard Express and the Adams Express, the successor of the Howard, since 1843 continuously. Mr. CONKLING married in 1843 Margaret E. HIBLER, daughter of Jacob HIBLER, and of German descent. Mr. and Mrs. CONKLING are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, politically a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 148)

HON. JAMES CRUIKSHANK, of the firm of CRUIKSHANK & Co., Danville, was born in Berks County, Penn., September 18, 1836, a son of James and Margaret (McFARLAND) CRUIKSHANK, natives of Scotland. His father was an iron molder and came from Scotland to Philadelphia in 1830, where he worked at his trade for a time. Our subject is the eldest of five children, and received his education in the common schools. In 1837 he was brought by his parents to Pottsville, where he was reared. In early life he learned the trade of iron molder, at which he worked until coming to Danville in 1873, and soon after embarked in his present business. The firm is among the most flourishing in Danville and its members are all energetic and enterprising. They divide the business and each is eminently fitted for the department under his care. Mr. CRUIKSHANK may usually be found in the shop, where from forty to sixty men are employed. Politically Mr. CRUIKSHANK is a Republican, and in 1875 and 1876 represented Montour County in the State Legislature; is now a member of the water committee of the borough of Danville. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the I. O. O. F. Encampment, also K. of P., and has served as Past Master in three secret societies. In 1856 he married Sarah J., daughter of Joseph WALTON. She is of English descent; has borne her husband five children: Ida M., wife of John F. MILLER; William; John C.; Emma F. and Charles W. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 148)

ROBERT CURRY (deceased) is numbered among the earliest settlers of this part of Pennsylvania. He was born in the North of Ireland, June 9, 1741; educated in the schools of his native country, where his father was a well-to-do linen manufacturer. He immigrated to America in 1772, settling on Mahoning Creek, in what is now Valley Township, Montour Co., Penn., and there followed farming. He was killed and scalped by the Indians June 9, 1780. He was a Presbyterian in religious belief and was one of the first to give his money and influence toward the propagation of the gospel in these parts, and was also trustee of his church. He married Miss Jane McWILLIAMS in Belfast, Ireland, and four children were born to them: James, who was born in Ireland, grew to manhood and settled in Ohio; Robert, who settled on the north branch of the Susquehanna River; William, who settled on the home place in Valley Township, Columbia Co., Penn., and Jane, the first white child born between the north and west branches of the Susquehanna River, married to Robert McWILLIAMS. The sons were well-to-do farmers, noted for their honesty and integrity. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 148)

THOMAS C. CURRY, of CRUIKSHANK, Mayer & Co., owners and proprietors of the Enterprise Foundry and Machine Shops, Ferry Street, Danville, is a grandson of Robert CURRY, whose sketch appears above. He and two sisters reside in Danville, Robert in an adjoining county, Hugh in Michigan, William in Kentucky. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 148)

JAMES F. DEEN, Danville, is a native of that place, born September 1, 1816, a son of John and Susan (McBRIDE) DEEN, natives of Pennsylvania. His father came to Danville in 1790, and was one of the first blacksmiths of the place. James F. is the fourth of eight children, was reared and educated in Danville, followed the blacksmith's trade with his father, and worked at the trade altogether for fifty-three years. April 3, 1839, he commenced the business of blacksmithing for himself, and on the 8th of August following moved to North Danville, occupying as a residence the first house built on the new town erected a blacksmith shop in which he began work January 2, 1840. In the fall of 1846 he purchased and built on ground, adjoining, a machine ship and foundry with other necessary buildings, in which he operated until 1847, when he moved to East Boston, Mass., where he remained until January, 1849, doing all of the wrought iron work for a large rolling-mill. He then returned to his old business at Danville, and in May, 1856, moved to Selin's Grove, where he built a foundry, machine shop, etc., and followed the business until 1858, when he moved to Sunbury, and there for five years did the repairing for the North Central Railroad. In 1862 he returned to his native place, which has since been his home, being occupied at the smith business until 1886, since which time he has been engaged in farming. During his long and active business career Mr. DEEN did much work in his line. To him is given the credit of doing the iron work in the first steam grist-mill built in Danville in 1839; did the smith work for large blast furnaces and much of the work for the large rolling-mill of the Montour Company. He owns valuable town property and a farm in Montour County, also a farm of 150 acres in Maury County, Tenn. He married, February 21, 1839, Margaret, daughter of Henry SAUNDERS, a shoemaker by trade. Mrs. DEEN was born July 31, 1820, is of German origin and the mother of eight children: John Henry, born January 2, 1840 (deceased); Martha Jane, born November 8, 1842 (deceased); Mary D., born November 9, 1844; John S., born in November, 1847; Alvaretta F., born March 23, 1850; Laura V., born July 31, 1853; Margaret E., born April 13, 1859; Elmer, born November 23, 1861, died September 26, 1863. Mr. and Mrs. DEEN are members of the Presbyterian Church. Politically he is a Republican. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and of the Masonic fraternity, and served seven years as a member of a rifle company in the militia at Danville. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 148)

PERRY DEEN, dealer in iron, P. O. Danville, was born in Danville, Penn., July 26, 1826, son of John and Mary (FLACK) DEEN, who were natives of Pennsylvania. His father was of Scotch and his mother of Irish origin. John DEEN was among the earliest blacksmiths of Danville, but in later life was a farmer. His family consisted of eight children, seven of whom lived to be grown. Our subject was the seventh in the family, and learned the tanner's trade early in life, which he followed for thirteen years, when he commenced to deal in scrap iron. In 1871 at the time when the co-operative Iron Rolling Mill Company was organized he was elected its president, and as such served three years; he then engaged in the lumber business for a time, also dealt in scrap iron, in which later business he has ever since continued. He has been twice married, first to Miss Mary J., daughter of Robert RICHARD; her parents were born in New Jersey and were of German origin. The children born to this union were John R. and Harriet. Mrs. DEEN died in 1860, and March 28, 1865, Mr. DEEN married Mary J., daughter of George and Elizabeth FULLMER; she is of German descent. Their children are Helen E., Mary, Sarah W. and Thomas E. The family are members of the Episcopal Church. In politics Mr. DEEN is a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 149)

F. C. DERR, merchant, Danville, was born in Moreland, Lycoming Co., Penn., July 29, 1836. His parents, Christopher and Mary (OPP) DERR, were natives of the Keystone State and descendants of English and German ancestors. Mr. DERR is the ninth in a family of ten children. He spent his boyhood on a farm with his parents, and, in common with country boys of the time, his early educational advantages were limited to the district school. At the age of eighteen he entered the academy at McEwensville, Northumberland County. Later he became a student at Bucknell University, Lewisburg. He left this institution in his sophomore year and entered the University of Rochester, N. Y., where he graduated in 1860. In an academy near his alma mater, Mr. DERR entered upon his chosen profession. In 1862 he returned to his native State and accepted the position of the principal of the Danville High School. At the head of this institution he remained for twenty-one years. He soon popularized himself by elevating the high school to a degree of excellence seldom attained to in a country town. Possessing, in addition to a vast store of knowledge, the faculty of bringing himself into a happy fellowship with the young in their aims and aspirations, he at once endeared himself to his pupils and impressed them with his rare ability as a teacher. Mr. DERR now finds himself surrounded in all circles by those who were his pupils at one time or another during his long career as a teacher. It would be difficult, indeed, to limit the extent to which Danville is indebted to him for its mental culture. In 1881 he received the appointment as school superintendent of Montour County. His term of office was marked by a gradual improvement in the schools under his charge, besides the unusually pleasant relations existing between the teachers and superintendent. In 1882 he went into the boot and shoe business, in Danville, taking as a partner William LUNGER. The confidence reposed in him as a teacher was now transferred to him as a merchant, and at no time was the firm of DERR & LUNGER without a liberal portion of the town's patronage. In 1887 he and Mr. LUNGER dissolved partnership, Mr. DERR assuming the whole business and continuing on at the old stand. In 1872 he married Martha B. BOWYER, daughter of John BOWER of Danville. This union has been blessed with one child, a son, named Clarence F. Mr. DERR is Knight Templar, a member of the Danville Lodge; No. 224, F. & A. M., and of the Holy Royal Arch Chapter, No. 239. He is a Republican in politics. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 149)

ALEXANDER M. DIEHL, grocer, Danville, was born December 11, 1848, in Danville, Penn., a son of Joseph and Elizabeth (VORIS) DIEHL, natives of Pennsylvania. His paternal and maternal ancestors were among the earliest settlers of Pennsylvania. His parents were among the early residents of Danville, and his father, who was a contractor and builder, was superintendent of the erection of the Grove Presbyterian Church. Alexander M. is the only son in a family of six children, five of whom grew to maturity. He was reared in Danville and educated at the Academy at that place. He first clerked in the office of WATERMAN & BEAVER, extensive iron manufacturers, with whom he remained eleven years. He then traveled two years for a grocery house in Philadelphia. In 1879 he established the New York Tea Store in Danville and subsequently added groceries to his stock. He is a liberal advertiser and has met with success in his enterprise. He acquired his business education at the Quaker City College, where he graduated in 1865. May 22, 1871, he married Jessie KROTHE, of German origin, and a daughter of Querin and Susan (LATIMER) KROTHE. This union has been blessed with two children, Ralph BEAVER and Estella B. (deceased). Mrs. DIEHL is a member of the Episcopal Church. Mr. DIEHL is a member of the I. O. O. F. and of the K. of P., in which he has been District Deputy. He does not affiliated with any political party. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 151)

HENRY EARP, coal dealer, Danville, was born in England, September 25, 1838, a son of William and Ann (TANDY) EARP, also natives of England, where the father was engaged in a rolling-mill for many years; later he immigrated to America, and in 1845 settled in Danville, where he commenced working at the same business, and helped to make the first railroad iron in Danville. He was born in 1806, and died at the age of seventy-two, in Danville, where he commenced work in the rolling-mills when quite young. He worked on contract, and by economy saved enough to enable him to embark in the coal business in 1882. He does a general retail business, bringing most of the coal by was of the canal, buying so as to sell at the lowest possible price. His gentlemanly deportment and accommodating disposition have brought him many customers, represents the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company. He married, in 1861, Anna, daughter of Benjamin ALWARD. She is of English origin, and her grandfather, one of the early settlers in this county, was its first sheriff, and for years justice of the peace. Politically he was a Democrat, until the breaking out of the war. Mr. and Mrs. EARP are members of the Episcopal Church, in which he is warden and also choir master. He is a Republican in politics, has served as member of the election board, is a member of the Masonic fraternity, of the I. O. O. F., Calumet Lodge, No. 279, and also of the K. of L., of Danville. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 152)

RICHARD W. EGGERT, editor and proprietor of the Gem, was born in Danville, Penn., November 2, 1839, a son of Xavier and Mary Anna (SMITH) EGGERT. His father was born in Baden-Baden, Germany, and his mother in Ithaca, N. Y., of French, English and German origin. The former was a watchmaker, and also dealt, for many years in Danville, in watches and jewelry. Richard W. is the second of seven children; he was educated in Danville, and in early life learned the printer's trade, which he has made the business of his life. He learned the printing business in the office of the Hon. V. BEST, who was United States senator, and has filled all the different positions from apprentice to editor and proprietor of a paper. He has published several papers in Danville, especially valuable for their local department, and is an excellent compositor. His latest journalistic venture, the Gem, has a larger circulation in Danville than any other paper published in Montour County. In 1863 he enlisted in Battery F, Second Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, or the One Hundred and Twelfth Regiment of Infantry, and served with honor until the close of the war. He is a member of the G. A. R., K. of P. and the M. B. of B. Politically he is independent. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 152)

JOSEPH FLANAGAN, brickmaker, Danville, was born in Snyder County, Penn., October 14, 1819, a son of James and Nancy (SRONTZ) FLANAGAN, of German and Irish origin, respectively. The father was also a brickmaker by occupation, and died in 1831. Joseph, the eldest of five children, was reared on the farm in Northumberland County, and learned his trade with his father. He opened a brickyard in Northumberland County over forty years ago, and has since made the manufacture of brick his main business, and followed it in Danville for over thirty years, meeting with success. He also dealt in merchandise, and owned a general store in Danville. In 1842 he married Catherine, daughter of Charles WHITE. The latter was also a brickmaker, and of Irish origin. To Mr. and Mrs. FLANAGAN five children were born, two of whom are now living (three having died in infancy): Laura, wife of I. T. PATTON, a merchant of Danville, who was born in that place June 5, 1843, to John and Nancy (BASSETT) PATTON, of English and Scotch origin. Mr. PATTON enlisted, in 1864, in Company C, One Hundred and Eighty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and participated in several hard-fought battles. He is a graduate of commercial college of Philadelphia, of the class of 1856. Mr. and Mrs. PATTON have five children: Joseph F., Harry B., John, Florence, May and Maggie. Mr. and Mrs. FLANAGAN's second child is Gertrude, now the wife of Thomas ELLIS, agent for the Catawissa Railroad at this place. Mr. GLANAGAN is a republican; has been assessor, school director and member of the town council of Danville. He is Past Grand in the I. O. O. F. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 152)

JAMES FOSTER, secretary of the Danville Stove Works, was born in the North of Ireland, March, 18, 1842. His father, Thompson FOSTER, who was a blacksmith, emigrated from Ireland to America in 1847, settling first in Pittsburgh, Penn., subsequently moving to Danville, where he resided about thirty years, and is now a resident of Philadelphia. James, the third of seven children, spent most of his life in Danville, where he received his education, and learned the blacksmith's trade with his father. Later he commenced work in the rolling-mills, which was his chief employment for about twenty years. When the Danville Stove Works were organized, the company elected him its secretary and treasurer, and as such he still serves. In 1862 he enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Thirty-second Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and was wounded in his first battle at Antietam. He remained with the regiment, however, and participated in the battles of Chancellorsville and Fredericksburg, and at the expiration of his term of service, re-enlisted, this time in the One Hundred and Ninety-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and was elected first lieutenant, served his term, hundred days, and was discharged in 1865. In 1866 he enlisted in the Two Hundred and Fourteenth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, which was the last regiment discharged from Pennsylvania. Politically Mr. FOSTER is a Republican, and has served as chairman of the water-works, and chief burgess of Danville. In 1864 he married Mary GULICK, a native of Danville, of English origin, and their children are John, Elizabeth, Jennie and Alexander. Mr. and Mrs. Foster are members of St. Paul Methodist Church, of which denomination he has been trustee. He has served four years as District Deputy of the I. O. O. F., Montour County Lodge, No. 279, and one term as commander of the G. A. R. Post at Danville. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 152)

JAMES O. FRAZIER, sheriff, Danville, was born in Danville, Montour Co., Penn., December 9, 1845; a son of Daniel FRAZIER, a farmer, who was elected sheriff in 1850, and was the first to be elected to that office in this county; he and his wife were natives, respectively, of Montour and Schuylkill Counties, Penn., and of Scotch-Irish and German origin. They were the parents of seven children, four now living. They moved to Washingtonville; attended the schools of Danville, and in early life followed farming until he was nominated on the Republican ticket and elected sheriff of Montour County in the fall of 1885, the only Republican ever elected to the office in Montour County. He married, in 1874, Mary, daughter of Jacob MARTZ, and of German origin. She is the mother of the following named children: Alice E., Daniel, Clarence W. and James O. Mrs. FRAZIER is a member of the Lutheran Church. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 153)

WILLIAM F. GEARHART, real estate agent and farmer, P. O. Riverside, Northumberland Co., Penn., was born August 17, 1824, to Herman and Abigal (BAYLOR) GEARHART, natives of Pennsylvania and early settlers of Rush Township. The grandfather, Jacob G., was a captain in the Revolutionary war and participated in the battle of Monmouth, where he was wounded; soon after that struggle he came to Northumberland County and entered land where the borough of Riverside is now located and where William F. resides. Herman GEARHART was a blacksmith and his brother, Jacob, was associate judge of Northumberland County. William F. is one of a family of twelve children, all of whom grew to maturity, and acquired his education in Danville and in early life clerked in a store in that place, and later went to California (in 1852), where he remained four years in the mining country. In the fall of 1856 he returned to Pennsylvania, spent the winter in Danville, and in the spring returned to the West, traveling through Utah, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, California and Wyoming. In 1869 he returned to Danville and has since divided most of the old farm, on the Susquehanna River, opposite Danville, into town lots, which will in all probability be the residence part of Danville for the wealthier class. The lands lie high from the river, with an easy elevation, and command a fine view of Danville. Mr. GEARHART also offers good inducements to a manufacturing company who will start a manufactory on that side of the river. He was a member of the I. O. O. F., Past Grand; politically he is a Democrat. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 153)

B. R. GEARHART, cashier of the First National Bank, Danville, was born in Northumberland County, Penn., August 20, 1843, a son of B. R. and Elizabeth (BOYD) GEARHART, natives of Pennsylvania, the latter of Irish origin. The father, who was of German descent, was a physician, and for many years successfully practiced his profession in Danville, where he died at the age of forty-two, the father of nine children, six of whom are living. Our subject received a limited education in the common schools and at the age of ten years went to York County, Penn., where he clerked in a store at Wrightsville for four years. He was then sent to learn the carpenter's trade, but thinking that telegraphy would be more congenial to his tastes, he commenced the study of the latter with a determination to succeed, and soon became a proficient operator. He worked at that art five years in Danville, dividing his time between Lackawanna and Catawissa Companies, and earned such a reputation for industry and promptness that the corporation of the First National Bank of Danville were induced to elect him teller in 1866. That position he held until 1870, when he was promoted cashier, which office he still fills. He married in 1872, Louise, daughter of Samuel YORK, and of English origin. Two children have been born to them: Anna and Robert. Mr. and Mrs. GEARHART are members of grove Presbyterian Church, of which he is a trustee, and has served as treasurer of the building committee. He is a Republican; has been a member of the town council of Danville. He is a Knight Templar. He enlisted in 1863 in Company D, under Col. RAMSEY, and served his full term of enlistment. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 153)

WILSON M. GEARHART, prothonotary and clerk of courts, P. O. Danville, was born in Northumberland County, Penn., January 23, 1846, a son of John (a farmer) and Martha (MARTIN) GEARHART. His parents were born in Pennsylvania, of German descent on his father's and of Irish on his mother's side; they reared two children, a son and a daughter. Of these, our subject is the younger. He grew to adult age on the farm in Northumberland County, obtained his early education with his parents on the far, and subsequently attended the Danville Institute; also Dickinson Seminary at Williamsport, where he graduated in the classical course in 1865. He then engaged as a teacher for two years; and from 1868 to 1872, was employed as bookkeeper and timekeeper in one of the large manufacturing companies of Danville, which then employed 1,700 men. He then embarked in the machinery business, gas-fitting and plumbing, at which he was engaged until elected to his present position as prothonotary and clerk of the courts of Montour until elected to his present position as prothonotary and clerk of the courts of Montour County, in 1875, and has since filled the office. He is a Republican, has served as a member of the school board, eight years, and is the present chairman of the finance committee. He takes an active interest in the leading secret societies and has prominently identified himself with them; has taken nearly all the degrees in Masonry. Mr. GEARHART was married in Danville, in 1867, to Miss M. Jennie BEAVER, daughter of Jesse BEAVER, who is of German origin. Their children are J. BEAVER, Lois M., Emeline S. Mr. and Mrs. GEARHART are members of the Methodist Church. He has been steward, trustee and Sabbath-school superintendent; is president of the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle of the State of Pennsylvania; is also vice-president of the Mountain Grove Camp-meeting Association, and has the general charge of the railroad rates for the meeting. He enlisted in the Union Army in June, 1863; was assigned to duty in the provost marshal's department at Washington, D. C., and resigned the same year to complete his studies. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 153)

EDWARD SAYRE GEARHART, attorney, Danville, is a son of Mayberry and Mary Catharine GEARHART, the former of Quaker, and the latter of Puritan descent. He is one of seven children, as follows: William G. (deceased): Sophie R., wife of Col. Charles W. ECKMAN, of Reading, Penn.; Clarence F., of Cresswell, Neb.; Minnie, wife of Henry M. HINCKLEY, Esq., of Danville, Penn.; Boone, wife of William VASTINE, and George S., of Catawissa, Penn. The subject of this sketch, the next to the youngest of the sons, was born at Roaringcreek, Montour Co., Penn., March 28, 1856. He lived at Roaringcreek, working on his father's farm in the summer and attending the neighboring public school in the winter until he was over fourteen years of age, when he went Danville and entered the National Iron Company's machine shops at that place as an apprentice. After completing his full term of apprenticeship as a machinist, in the fall of 1875 he entered Wyoming Seminary at Kingston, Penn., as a student, and graduated the following year. In the fall of 1876 he entered Princeton College, New Jersey, as a student, and graduated in the class of 1880. While a student at Princeton he took an active part in the politics of that State and made political speeches in behalf of the Republican ticket. During the last years of his collegiate course he read law with the Hon. John F. HAGERMAN, master in chancery for the State of New Jersey. After his graduation he returned to Danville, Penn., and entered as a student of law in the office of Messrs. GRIER & HINCKLEY, and was admitted to the Montour County bar in 1881. In the presidential campaign of 1880 he stumped a portion of the State of Garfield, for whom he cast his first presidential vote, and in 1882 for the regular Republican nominee for governor. He was a delegate to the Republican State Convention which met at Harrisburg, Penn., in 1883. May 30, 1883, he delivered the memorial oration at Gettysburg, and on the same occasion, the year following, delivered the oration of the day at Antietam. He was also the orator of the day at Washington, D. C., at the memorial services in 1885, and has delivered many other orations of various kinds on numerous occasions. At the inauguration of the presidential campaign of 1884, at the personal request of Gen. John A. Logan, he was appointed a national Republican orator by the Republican National Committee, and under its direction he canvassed several States, principal of which were Ohio and Indiana, closing the campaign in Philadelphia. He has never sought nor held any public office, and no position of private trust, except as president of the Lochiel Iron and Steel Works at Harrisburg, Penn., which position he has held from the time of its incorporation. Since his admission to the bar in 1881, he has closely applied himself to the practice of his profession in his own and in various others counties of the State. On the 5th of may, 1886, he married Miss Ella R. CREVELING, daughter of Alfred CREVELING, general manager of the Lochiel Iron & Steel Works at Harrisburg, Penn. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 154)

GEORGE F. GEISINGER, (deceased) was born in Massachusetts in 1821, a son of Commodore David GEISINGER. At the age of sixteen years he left school in Boston for Baltimore, to take a situation in a mercantile house there. He accompanied his father to the Mediterranean in 1844 and returned to Baltimore in 1846. In 1847 he went to South America, where he remained until 1849, when he went to California. In 1851 he joined his father in Philadelphia, and from that time until 1854 was his secretary at the naval asylum. He came to Danville in June, 1855, and was employed as bookkeeper for Groves & Bro., iron manufacturers, and subsequently occupied the same position with Thomas BEAVER & Co., also engaged in the iron business. Later he took an interest in the firm, which was very successful, and was bookkeeper in their office in all over twenty-four years. He made his own way in the world, and by energy and perseverance succeeded in amassing a competency. His life is an illustration of what a man may accomplish in a few years. In 1866 he married Abigal A. CORNELISON, who survives him. Mr. GEISINGER died in 1883, a member of the Mahoning Presbyterian Church, of which he was trustee, and of which his widow is still a member. Politically, he was a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 154)

JOHN K. GERINGER, proprietor of the City Hotel, Danville, was born in Montour County, Penn., August 2, 1852, a son of Adam and Angeline (SMITH) GERINGER, natives of Pennsylvania, former (a miller by trade) of English origin, and latter of German. Adam GERINGER commenced the hotel business in 1853, and in 1855 opened a hotel in Mausdale, this county, which he conducted until 1870. He then came to Danville, bought the White Swan Hotel, and in 1872 moved it to the rear and erected the commodious brick structure now known as the City Hotel. This building is 41x80 feet, three stories high, and contains a large number of sleeping chambers, nicely furnished and well ventilated. The dining-room is eighty feet in length, with every modern convenience for the accommodation of a large number of guests. Mr. Adam GERINGER died in 1881, and since that time the hotel has been conducted by his son, John K. the subject of this sketch is the third of seven children: was reared and educated in his native county, and spent the most of his life in hotels. October 24, 1874, he married, in Montour County, Laura J., daughter of John DILDINE, of Montour County, and three children have been born to their union: Laura K., William and Nellie. Mrs. GERINGER is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. GERINGER is a Democrat, and has been a delegate to the county and State conventions of his party; also served as a member of council of Danville. He is a Sir Knight Templar. The "City Hotel: is in the central part of the town, in the business portion, and presents many attractions to the public. It is well known and liberally patronized. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 155)

S. M. GIBBS, principal of the high school, Danville, was born in Lansing, Tompkins Co., N. Y., July 27, 1836, a son of William and Margaret (MINIER) GIBBS, natives of New York and of Scotch-Irish and German origin. When S. M., the elder of two children, was twelve years old his father moved to Cameron, Steuben Co., N. Y. Our subject was educated at the Wesleyan Seminary, Lima, N. Y., and at Alfred University in the same State. He commenced teaching at fourteen years of age, which has been his principal occupation since, eight years of which time he taught at Danville. He has taught in several high schools and seminaries in New York and Pennsylvania. He enlisted in the service during the war, but was granted a special discharge on furnishing a substitute to complete his term of enlistment. He has a wife, Mary T. GIBBS, and four children. He and his wife are members of the Episcopal Church. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 155)

JOHN H. GOESER, wholesale dealer in cigars, tobacco and vinegar, and agent for ocean steamship lines, Danville, was born in that place June 1, 1852, a son of Anthony and Catherine (SHUMACHER) GOESER, natives of Prussia. His father was a hotel-keeper, but spent the most of his life in America, crossing the ocean five times. In 1842 he settled in Danville, where he followed hotel-keeping for many years and died in 1880. John H. is the only son, and was reared in Danville, where he was educated. In early life he embarked in the tobacco business, which has since grown to be quite extensive. In 1878 he married Miss Theresa, daughter of Joseph LIEBNER, of Pottsville. Mr. and Mrs. GOESER are members of the Catholic Church and the parents of one child, Coletta Emma. Politically Mr. GOESER is a Democrat. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 155)

GEORGE J. GRAUEL, M. D. Danville, was born in Fulda, Germany, May 26, 1825, came to America in 1853, and located in Danville in 1862. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 155)

I. X. GRIER, attorney, Danville, was born in that place December 27, 1835, a son of Michael and Isabella (MONTGOMERY) GRIER, the latter a daughter of Alexander Montgomery and granddaughter of Gen. William MONTGOMERY, the founder of Danville. Michael GRIER was a merchant in early life; later superintended the erection of telegraph lines, and died December 25, 1879. His family consisted of five children, who grew to adult age: W. A. M., a resident of Brooklyn, N. Y.; Rev. John B., a Presbyterian minister; H. J., the wife of John C. YOUNGMAN, a banker in Kansas; Mary G., wife of Edwin C. ELY, of Peoria, Ill., and I. X. Our subject was educated in the schools of Danville and also at Lafayette College, from which he graduated in 1858. Prior to entering college and after graduating he was connected with the Susquehanna River Telegraph Company, and at the time of its construction, opened a number of offices and instructed operators at the respective places. He later served as secretary and treasurer of the company until it was merged into the Western Union. He read law in the office of E. H. BALDY, Esq., and was admitted to the bar in 1861, practiced in the courts of Montour and adjoining counties, and in the United States courts until 1884, when failing health obliged him to relinquish his labors. He was notary public from 1862 until 1880, and was a member of the firm of MARKLE, GRIER & Co., who for about two years conducted a railroad-iron mill at Danville. Mr. GRIER is at present a director of the First National Bank of Danville, of the North Branch Steel Company, of the Danville Bridge Company and of the Mahoning Rolling Mill Company. He married in 1865 Emma W., daughter of Hon. James M. PORTER, of Easton, Penn., and two children have been born to them; J. M. PORTER and Isabella L. Hon. Mr. PORTER was at one time Secretary of War; was president judge of Northampton County, and an eminent attorney. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 155)

R. M. GROVE, manufacturer, Danville, was born in Lebanon County, Penn., October 28, 1847, a son of Michael J. and Catherine (HOUTZ) GROVE, natives of Pennsylvania, whose ancestors were among the early German settlers of the State. His father was an iron manufacturer, dealt largely in iron ore lands, and was among the first to foresee the possibilities of the iron industry at Danville. Here, for many years, he and his brother were extensive manufacturers and amassed a large fortune, consisting of iron and iron ore lands located in several States and Canada. They built a large furnace in Danville, and erected a mansion at a cost of $200,000, which is still occupied by the family. Michael J. died in 1877, in Danville, where he had resided since 1851. His family consisted of two sons: John H., the elder, is a resident of Danville, and devotes his time to scientific investigations. Our subject, the youngest son, was reared in Danville, where he received his early education; later he entered Yale College, New Haven, Conn., from which he graduated in 1867. He then returned to Danville and entered the office of his father and uncle to learn the iron business, which at the death of his father was left to our subject and his brother, John H., who have since conducted it. Mr. GROVE is a director of the First National Bank of Danville, and is also a director and treasurer of the Danville Nail & Manufacturing Company. In 1877 he married Margaret, daughter of Samuel YORKS, and two children have blessed their union: Mary Catherine and Margaret Louise. Mrs. GROVE is a member of the Presbyterian Church. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 156)

CHARLES P. HANCOCK, merchant, Danville, of which place he is a native, was born February 5, 1860, a son of William and Mary (REAY) HANCOCK, former a native of England, later of Maryland, both of English descent. Their family consisted of three children, of whom our subject is the eldest. His father was employed in iron works in his native country, and after his arrival in America engaged first in the Montour Iron Works. In 1874 he formed a partnership with John FOLEY, and established the "Rough and Ready Rolling Mill," and afterward became its owner. Subsequently a stock company was formed, and the name of the business was changed to the "National Iron Works," and Mr. HANCOCK was chosen president of the company. He was a successful business man, very popular with all those with whom he associated. He died in Danville, and will long be remembered by those who shared his friendship and enjoyed his favor. Our subject was reared in Danville, where he received his education, and where in early life he engaged for three years in the dry goods business as salesman. Later he was employed in a similar capacity at Scranton, and in this capacity has few equals in middle Pennsylvania. He inherits his father's gentlemanly demeanor and upright business habits, which naturally bring him a liberal patronage. His dry goods store, which is the largest in that line in Danville, is conducted on first-class principles, and affords employment to six clerks. Mr. HANCOCK opened his establishment in 1884, and has since built up a large trade. He is yet unmarried, is a member of the Heptasophs Society, and secretary of the Merchants Protective Society of Danville. Politically he is a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 156)

FREDERICK HELD, boot and shoe dealer, Danville, was born in Germany June 12, 1840, son of Peter and Catherine (KOPP) HELD, natives of Germany, where the father was a laborer. Frederick is the eldest of four children and was reared by his parents in Germany, where he acquired his education. In 1864 he came to America and in 1865 to Danville, where he worked at boot and shoe-making which he still follows, having learned the trade in Germany. By economy and good management he has succeeded in acquiring a competency, owning two houses and lots and the storeroom in which he carries on his business. In 1863 he married Miss Minnie (daughter of John Adam LUCKHARDT) who bore him one son, Jacob, and who died in 1867. He married as his second wife Christina KUGLER, of German origin, who has borne him the following named children: Amelia, Elizabeth, Anna and Peter Frederick. Mr. and Mrs. HELD are consistent members of the Lutheran Church, in which he is elder. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 156)

WILLIAM HENRIE (deceased) was a native of New Jersey, born in 1799, of English origin. He grew to manhood in his native State where he received his education in the common schools, and afterward followed the milling business for several years. His family consisted of eight children, five of whom are now living. Mr. HENRIE came to Danville, Penn., about 1833, and kept hotel until his death in 1876. He was a Democrat until 1856, after which he voted with the Republican party; served as a member of the town council, and also as burgess of Danville. Two of his daughters are now residents of Danville; one is the wife of J. C. RHODES, and the other the wife of R. H. WOOLLEY, a successful coal dealer. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 156)

H. M. HINCKLEY, attorney, Danville, was born in Harrisburg, Penn., June 2, 1850; a son of Joel and Theodosia (GRAYDON) HINCKLEY. His mother was also a native of the same State and of Scotch-Irish origin; his father, born in Vermont, of English origin, was hardware merchant, engaged in mercantile business all his life. His family consisted of eight children, three of whom grew to maturity. Our subject, who is the only one now surviving, received the rudiments of his education in his native town, and subsequently attended Princeton College, where he graduated in the regular course in the class of 1874, and during his last years in college had found time to study law and also keep up with his classes. In the year 1872, he took up the study of law in the offices of his after partner in business, I. X. GRIER, of Danville, and was admitted to practice in the courts of Montour County in 1875, and to the supreme court in 1878. He has since met with marked success and is numbered among the leading men of his profession in Montour County. He was united in marriage, in 1874, with Miss Amelia, daughter of Mayberry GEARHART. Her parents were members of the Society of Friends and of German descent. The children of Mr. and Mrs. HINCKLEY are Sarah G., John M., Eleanor G. and Edna. The parents are members of the Presbyterian Church, in which Mr. HINCKLEY is elder and trustee, taking an active interest in the Sabbath-school, in which he has been superintendent for several years. He is a Republican, but takes no very active part in politics, preferring to devote his time to his profession. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 156)

NICHOLAS HOFER, retired carpenter, contractor, lumber dealer, etc., Danville, was born September 14, 1823, in Baden, Germany, where he received his education. He is the eldest of five children, and early in life served a regular apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade, which he followed in his native country until 1852. He then took passage for America to seek his fortune, landing in New York City, where he worked for four weeks. Thence he went to Newark, N. J., where he first worked for 75 cents a day, then $1 and later $1.50. It was there he met Miss Clara WITZ, whom he married in 1854, and who was also born in Baden, Germany. In 1855 they came to Danville, Penn., and on arriving, found their funds exhausted, and were $5 in debt besides. Mr. HOFER soon found work at his trade, his diligence, industry and knowledge of his business soon bringing him custom. He first worked by the day; then contracted, erecting many of the residences of Danville, and carried on business successfully and extensively for years, and finally added the lumber trade. His only child, Edward, is at present a carpenter and contractor, having learned the trade with his father, and also owns and operates the lumber yard at Danville. Mr. HOFER has retired from active duties, having accumulated a goodly share of this world's goods, and whatever efforts he now makes are for the benefit of his only son, who resides near his parents and is doing well. Mr. HOFER is a Democrat, and has been a member of the town council of Danville; is a member of the K. of P. and I. O. O> F. societies, both of the encampment and subordinate lodges, and is a member also of the Masonic fraternity. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 157)

W. K. HOLLOWAY, superintendent of the store of the Montour Iron & Steel Company, Danville, was born in Berks County, Penn., January 1, 1835, a son of Samuel (a farmer) and Sarah (KIRLING) HOLLOWAY, natives of Berks County, Penn., and of English origin. Our subject was reared on the farm, and attended the common schools of his native county. Not liking farming, he obtained, in his thirteenth year, a position as clerk in a store in Reading, Penn., where he remained one year; was then employed at other work until coming to Danville, in 1856, when he clerked another year, and was then promoted to time-keeper and superintendent of accounts. He was next promoted to cashier, which responsible position he filled for twelve years, and in 1878 was made general superintendent of the store. The importance of this trust can be better realized when it is considered that the annual sales of this business run as high as $500,000, and its success is very largely due to Mr. HOLLOWAY's complete system and exact business management, he having been engaged in almost all the departments of the store for over thirty years. He married, in 1859, Ruth, daughter of Jacob YEAGER, of Columbia County, Penn., and they have five children: Sally, Lizzie, William, Thomas Beaver and Mary. Mrs. HOLLOWAY and eldest daughter are members of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. HOLLOWAY is a Republican, a member of the town council of Danville, and chairman of the water committee. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 157)

F. P. HOWE, president of the North Branch Steel Works, Danville, was born in Philadelphia, Penn., September 19, 1852, a son of Bishop Mark Anthony De Wolfe HOWE and Elizabeth (MARSHALL) HOWE, the former a native of Rhode Island, and the latter of Virginia, both of English origin. The father is the Episcopal bishop of the diocese of central Pennsylvania. F. P. is the fourth in a family of six children. Our subject attended school in his native city of Philadelphia until fifteen years of age, when he entered Brown University, Providence, R. I., where he graduated in the regular classical course with the degree of A. M. He was then engaged in the office of the rolling-mills of the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Company for three years, and at the expiration of that time entered Lehigh University, and took a full course in mining engineering, graduating in 1878. He was again employed by the Rolling Mill Company for a year, when he accepted a position as chemist for the Keystone Furnace Company, which he filled until 1880. In that year he came to Danville, and, on the organization of the Montour Iron & Steel Company, was made general superintendent, and operated the works for five years. He then resigned his position, having purchased a rolling-mill at Phillipsburg, N. J., but had hardly got it in operation before he was called to his present position. He married, in 1881, Katherine, daughter of W. J. WOODWARD, of Berks County, Penn. Her parents were of English descent, and her father, a Democrat, was elected supreme judge of Pennsylvania in 1874, serving with honor until his death. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 157)

DAVID C. HUNT, manufacturer of light wagons and carriages, Danville, was born in Bedford County, Penn., May 8, 1842, a son of G. W. and Hannah (SMITH) HUNT, the latter a Quaker of English origin. David C. is the eighth in a family of nine sons and three daughters, ten of whom grew to maturity. He was reared in Bedford County, and at the age of twelve years went to Urbana, Ohio, to learn the carriage-maker's trade (which was also his father's business), where he remained five years. In 1860 he came to Danville and, in partnership with his brother, George E. and John H., embarked in the business of manufacturing and repairing carriages. The firm continued thus until 1865, when the partnership was dissolved, and the business continued until 1876 by G. E. HUNT. Since then David C. has conducted the business alone, and has been very successful. His experience, mechanical skill and attention to business have eminently fitted him for his vocation. In 1865 he married Kate GULICK, a daughter of Isaac GULICK. Her parents were among the early settlers of Montour County, and of German origin. Mrs. HUNT bore her husband two children, Horace and Edward, and died in 1873, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1876 Mr. HUNT married Kate, daughter of William RICHARD, of English origin, and three children have been born to the union: Montgomery, William and Ralph. Mr. HUNT served in the quartermaster's department of the Union army in 1864, and was stationed at Little Rock, Ark. Politically, he is a Democrat. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 157)

JOSEPH HUNTER, collector of bridge toll, Danville, was born in Montour (then Columbia) County, Penn., November 15, 1823, a son of Joseph and Martha (HUNTER) HUNTER, the former a native of Ireland and the latter of Pennsylvania, of Irish origin. The father came to America before he attained his majority, and was employed on public works in Pennsylvania, and also took contracts and built canals and railroads. His early life was passed as a school-teacher; later as a contractor, but finally in the lumber business. His family consisted of ten children, Joseph being the fourth. Our subject was born in this county, but at the age of six years removed to Milton, where he received his education and served an apprenticeship at shoemaking. In 1844 he came to Danville and engaged in the manufacture of boots and shoes until 1851, since which time he has occupied his present position. Politically, he is a Democrat; he has served six terms as burgess of Danville, being elected the first time in 1879. In 1846 he married Mehetabel A. CAMPBELL, a native of Pennsylvania and of Scotch descent. Their children are Henrietta M., Joseph C., James K. and William E., the last named deceased. Mrs. HUNTER died in 1859, and in 1861 our subject married Miss Elizabeth H., daughter of John W. MILES. Mrs. HUNTER is an active worker in the Sabbath-schools of Danville, and she and her husband are members of the First Baptist Church, with which he has been connected since 1845, and in which he has served as deacon for over thirty years. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 158)

JAMES M. IRELAND, of McMahan & Ireland, leading photographers, Danville, was born on the old homestead farm in Turbot township, Northumberland County, September 23, 1847. He is a son of John M. and Amanda M. (McMAHAN) IRELAND, former of Northumberland county, latter of Montour, both members of the Presbyterian Church. Their ancestors, paternal and maternal, were Scotch-Irish Presbyterians, and among the earliest settlers of Pennsylvania. John and Amanda IRELAND had a family of two sons and two daughters, James M. being the eldest. Our subject worked on the farm, attending school until in August, 1864, when he enlisted in Company E, Ninth Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry, and served until the close of the war. He was captured at Woodbury, Tenn., and paroled some three weeks later. At the close of the war he returned to Danville, where he has since resided. He married Miss Lucy F. MAXWELL, of Carbondale, Lackawanna Co., Penn., daughter of Robert and Jean (DOUGLAS) MAXWELL, former a merchant at Carbondale. Mr. and Mrs. IRELAND have four children living: Grace L., Robert D., Thomas C. and Helen C. Mr. IRELAND is a member of the G. A. R., Goodrich Post, No. 22. In politics he is a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 158)

JOHN JACOBS, baker, and wholesale and retail dealer in confectionery, Mill Street, Danville, was born in Germany, September 19, 1836, a son of Henry and Elizabeth (WEBER) JACOBS, who were also natives of Germany, where his father was a farmer. John is the sixth of eight children, was reared on the farm with his parents and was educated in the schools of his native country until his seventeenth year. In 1854 he came to America, first settling at Pottsville, Penn., where he learned to manufacture all kinds of candy, and worked at that business until 1859, when he came to Danville. In 1860 he established his present business, and has succeeded in building up a good trade. He married December 1, 1859, Charlotte, daughter of Frederick and Elizabeth (DIETRICK) FRISCH, natives of Germany. Mr. FRISCH was a pattern-maker by trade, and worked at it in Danville for several years. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. JACOBS: Frederick, Charles, George, Clara, Alfred, Maggie, John and Mary. The parents are members of the Lutheran Church, of which Mr. JACOBS was treasurer of the board of trustees for many years. Politically he is a Democrat, and has been assessor of Danville; is a member of the I. O. O. F., also of the K. of P., a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity and a Sir Knight Templar. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 158)

U. Y. JAMES, dealer in groceries, flour and feed, Danville, was born on Ferry Street of that city, June 3, 1858, a son of Josiah and Jane (MEREDITY) JAMES, natives of Pennsylvania and of English origin. His father came to Danville in 1849, and worked in the ore mines, but subsequently followed the mercantile trade, and now leads a retired life in Danville. Our subject is the youngest of two children, and was reared in Danville, where he attended the public schools. Early in life he commenced to work in his father's store and finding the mercantile trade congenial to his taste, embarked in the present business on Market Street in 1881, and has since been very successful. He is obliging to all, keeps a delivery wagon and attends closely to business. In 1882 he married Minerva, a native of Pennsylvania, of German origin, and the daughter of William JOHNSTON. Mr. and Mrs. JAAMES have one child, May; they attend the Methodist Church. Mr. JAMES is a Republican, an active member of the K. of L. and of the I. O. O. F. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 158)

CAPT. JOSEPH H. JOHNSON, merchant, Danville, was born in Pottsville, Penn., March 18, 1840, the only child of Joseph and Nancy (GEDLING) JOHNSON, natives of Durham, England. The parents were married in their native country in 1839, and on coming to America soon after, settled in Pottsville, Schuylkill County, where the father worked in mines. Subsequently he moved to Philadelphia where he died in 1843. Our subject attended school but nine months in all, and has passed the most of his life in Danville. He commenced to work in the "Rough and Ready Rolling Mill" at Danville, when only ten years old, and followed that business for twenty-four years, filling many positions from boy to superintendent. April 27, 1861, he enlisted in the service of his adopted country, in Company C, Fourteenth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, for three months; served his term of enlistment, and the same year re-enlisted, this time in Company H, Ninety-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and participated in the following battles: Chantilly, Antietam, Mays Heights, Fredericksburg, Salem Heights, Gettysburg, Rappahannock, Mud Run, Williamsburg, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, first battle in front of Petersburg, Fort Stephens and Charleston, Va. He was in twenty-four engagements and was present at the surrender of Gen. Lee. He entered as private and returned home as captain, having acted as such the last year of the war. In 1875 he established JOHNSON's green grocery, at which business he is still actively engaged. He is a member of the G. A. R., and of the I. O. O. F., of which he is now Noble Grand, of Calumet Lodge, No. 279, of Danville. In politics he is a Republican. Capt. JOHNSON married in 1886, Elizabeth C., daughter of Urias TILLSON, a native of Massachusetts, of English descent, and by trade a molder. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 161)

WILLIAM C. JOHNSTON, register and recorder, Danville, was born in Columbia County, Penn. (in what is now Derry Township, Montour County) February 14, 1818, a son of Walter (a farmer) and Elizabeth (CRAIG) JOHNSTON, natives of Lancaster County, Penn., and of Scotch-Irish origin, and whose family consisted of four children, of whom William C. is the eldest. Our subject was reared on the farm and attended the common schools of Derry Township, and Danville, also those of Milton and Lewisburg. At the age of sixteen he obtained a certificate to teach school, and followed the profession for twelve years, a part of the time in Danville. He was elected register and recorder of Montour County in 1850, being the first to occupy that position in this county, and has held it ever since. He has also read law, but prefers his present business. He married, October 13, 1857, Amanda BLUE, a daughter of Isaiah BLUE, a farmer. She was of Scotch-Irish descent, died in Danville, April 13, 1886, and is buried in the new Presbyterian burying-ground, loved and respected by all who knew her. To Mr. and Mrs. JOHNSTON were born the following named children: Agnes B., Elizabeth A., Sally C., Samuel and Mary Amanda. The family attend the Presbyterian Church. Mr. JOHNSTON is a Democrat in politics, and served several terms as school director. He was formerly a prominent member of the I. O. O. F., and was Noble Grand of the subordinate lodge. He was among the first members of the Masonic fraternity of the first lodge organized in Danville. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 161)

HARRY KEARNS, tobacco and cigar dealer, Danville, was born in Manchester, England, July 23, 1828, a son of Henry and Sarah (WARD) KEARNS, natives respectively of Ireland and England. The father was an overseer in a woolen factory for many years, but resigned his position, in 1862, to come to America. He settled in Philadelphia, where he died in 1864, at the age of seventy-five years. Henry was reared in England, where he was also educated, and in early life learned the trade of gas-fitting. In 1854 he came to America and worked in Philadelphia at the gas-fitting business for Morrs & Decker, which he has followed in this county for thirty-two years. He has also traveled and worked to a considerable extent in large cities. In 1861 he enlisted at Chicago, Ill., in Battery D, of the First Artillery, and participated in several battles, including Atlanta, where the concussion of the guns caused him to lose his hearing. He served until the close of the war, and, in 1865, returned to Philadelphia. He then went to Ohio, where he engaged in the plumbing business for three years, when he returned to Philadelphia and served for a time as engineer at the Girard House. In 1874 he came to Danville and took charge of the machinery and gas-fitting in the asylum, and remained in charge until 1886, when he resigned. Since then he has been engaged in his present business. He married at Baltimore, Md., Miss Margaret Alice, daughter of John SMITH, a mill owner, of English descent. One child, James W., blessed the union. Mr. KEARNS is a member of the I. O. O. F., of the K. of P., and also of the G. A. R. Mrs. KEARNS is a member of the German Reformed Church. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 161)

SIMON KREBS, senior member of the firm of KREBS & Co., dealers in wines and liquors, Danville, is a native of Germany, born April 10, 1839, to John and Catherine (SCHEIDS) KREBS, also natives of Germany. The father was a farmer, kept a vineyard and manufactured wine; immigrated to America in 1855, settling in Schuylkill County, Penn., where he spent the remainder of his life. He was born in 1809 and died in his seventy-third year. Simon is the youngest of three sons and two daughters, and was reared with his parents on the farm in Germany until he was fifteen years old. He came with his family to America, learned the carpenter's trade, and at the age of nineteen went to California, where he worked at his trade two years. In 1864 he returned to Pennsylvania, and in 1868 came to Danville. He took the contract and built the water-works at Danville in 1872 and 1873 at a cost of $165,000, and it is often said to Mr. KREBS' credit, that the works are first-class in every respect. He is a member of the Democratic party, and takes a lively interest in politics, but has never held office, though frequently a delegate to the county conventions. In 1865 he married Harriet, daughter of Jacob SWARTZ, a prominent merchant at Tamaqua, and of German descent. To the union the following children have been born: Adda L., George J., Clara, Lewis J. and Leah. Mr. and Mrs. KREBS are members of the German Reformed Church. Mr. KREBS is the owner of iron mines in Snyder County, Penn., which he has been working since 1874, and each year has shipped on an average 4,000 tons of ore, which is known as the bird eye ore. Thirty-six men are employed in his mines. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 162)

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