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COLUMBIA COUNTY, PA BIOGRAPHIES

BRIARCREEK

From "The History of Columbia and Mountour Counties"
Battle, 1887


 
ENOS L. ADAMS, retired farmer, P.O. Berwick, was born in Briarcreek Township, July 28, 1824, a son of Samuel and Esther (HILL) ADAMS, natives of Columbia County and of German descent. His great-grandfather came from Germany and located in Berks County, and over 130 years ago bought 900 acres where our subject now lives. The grandfather of Enos L. next took the homestead in this county, where he farmed all his life, and here also his son, subject's father, farmed. Enos L. is of the fourth generation now on this farm where he was born and reared. He owns 265 acres of land, beside three houses and lots in Berwick. He married in March, 1847, Margaret KISNER, a native of Luzerne County, and nine children blessed their union, eight of whom are living: Alice, wife of James FREAS; Samuel, Kenny, Anna M., William, Elliott, Margaret and Fannie. Mr. and Mrs. ADAMS are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the Grange and has held the office of township assessor.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg 383)

GEORGE WESLEY ASH, proprietor Briar Creek Excelsior Mills, P. O. Berwick this mill was built in 1874, to take the place of one destroyed by fire, by Ruckle & Ash. The mill was owned by that firm up to 1880, when Charles ASH, father of George Wesley, bought the interest of Mr. RUCKLE, and the plant is now owned by the Messrs. ASH, Charles and George W. The building is 40x50 feet in ground area, and is three and one-half stories in height; is supplied with three run of buhrs; is run by water, and the power is supplied from a turbine wheel. They have a dam across Briar creek from which the water is supplied. George W. ASH is the managing miller. George Wesley ASH, operator of Briar Creek Excelsior Mills, was born in Fishingcreek Township, this county, October 15, 1850, son of Charles and Sarah (RUCKLE) ASH. Christian ASH, grandfather of George W., came to this county in the early days from Northampton County, Penn., and bought a tract of land now owned by William and Charles ASH, two of his sons, and here he lived until his death. He died about 1879, his wife having preceded him in death by a number of years. They are buried at Zion Church, Fishingcreek Township. Charles ASH, father of G. W., was born in Northampton County, Penn., and was but a boy seven years old when his parents removed to this county. He made his home with his parents until he married, and then bought a part of the old homestead of his father, in Fishingcreek Township, where he has resided ever since. He was married in this county to Miss Sarah RUCKLE, and they were the parents of nine children, of whom eight are living: George Wesley, William S., who lives in Briarcreek Township, this county; Pierce Wilson, who lives in Fishingcreek Township, this county, farming his father's place; Harvey Reuben, who lives in Berwick, this county; Stewart Alexander, who works in the mill; Miles Wilbert, who lives on the old homestead, and with his brother, Pierce Wilson, farms the place; Thomas Elliott, who lives on the old homestead and Amy Florentine. Alvin Willits is deceased. The father of this family still resides on the old homestead, which was bought by his father when he came to Fishingcreek township. His wife died February 19, 1886, and is buried in Zion Church graveyard. George Wesley ASH, subject of this sketch, was reared in Fishingcreek Township, this county, and when he had reached the age of nearly twenty-two years he went to learn the milling trade in the mill which stood on the site of the one he at present operates. This mill was then owned by his father and Mr. RUCKLE, and when it burned down and the new one was rebuilt he continued in the employ of the firm, and the second year after it was rebuilt he was the miller of the plant. The mill is now owned by Mr. ASH and his father. George Wesley and his brother, William, erected a distillery in 1883, and have operated it up to April 21, 1886, when Mr. ASH bought his brother William's share, and since that date has operated it himself. The capacity of this distillery is considerable. Mr. ASH and his father have an eight-acre lot in connection with the works, which he farms. He was married in this county February 22, 1880, to Miss Amelia FREAS, a native of Columbia County, and daughter of William L. and Fannie (RITTENHOUSE) FREAS. Mr. and Mrs. ASH are the parents of one child, Wilbert Charles. Our subject is at present one of the school directors of Briarcreek Township, having been elected in 1884.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg 383-84)

DAVID BAUCHER, mason, Berwick, was born in Mahoning Township July 27, 1822, and is a son of Jacob and Zena (ZIMMERMAN) BAUCHER, natives of Schuylkill County, Penn., and of German descent. His great-grandfather came from Germany and located in Schuylkill County. His grandfather followed farming and died in that county. Jacob BAUCHER was reared in Schuylkill County and remained there until he was thirty-five years of age. He then moved to what is now Montour County and bought a farm in Mahoning Township, which he had operated by his sons. He was a millwright, which trade he followed nearly all his life. He died in 1827. He was the father of nine children, five of whom are living: Joseph, Nancy, Jacob, David and Thomas. Our subject was only seven years old when his father died, and he remained with his mother until he was twenty-one, in the meantime learning the mason's trade. In 1842 he came to Berwick and worked at his trade several years; then in partnership with Daniel REEDY he began contracting. After some years the partnership was dissolved and Mr. BAUCHER continued in business alone. In April, 1844, he married Rachel SYBERT, a native of Luzerne County. They are the parents of eight children, five of whom are living: Fannie, wife of Frank CORKINS; William E., Eliza, wife of Joseph G. WILLIAMSON; Lillie, wife of Sterling DICKSON, and Gilbert. The deceased are Cordelia A., Jane R. and Janetta. Mr. and Mrs. BAUCHER are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church; he is a member of the I. O. O. F., in which he has passed all the chairs. He has been on the town council several terms, and school director; he also been constable. He is steward in the Methodist Episcopal Church.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg 384)

ISAIAH BOWER, merchant and real estate dealer, Berwick, was born in Briarcreek Township, Columbia Co., Penn., March 19, 1829, a son of George Michael and Mary (ZAHNER) BOWER, natives of Columbia County and of German descent. His grandfather, George Michael BOWER, was born in Germany; came to America when thirteen years of age and settled in Lehigh County along the Lehigh. He came to Columbia County in the latter part of the last century and settled in Briarcreek Township, at which time there was but one house in Berwick. He bought a large tract of land and there resided until his death. Both the grandfathers settled here. The grandfather, George ZAHNER, was a great hunter and at the time of his coming, game was very plentiful. He first built a log cabin. The nearest market was then at Philadelphia or Reading. George Michael BOWER was a weaver by trade, also followed farming and taught a school at his own house. A prominent man in his day, he died in Briarcreek Township in December, 1863, in his eighty-third year. His wife died about six years prior. Isaiah was reared on a farm and when eighteen years of age went to learn the carpenter's trade and the building of threshing machinery. He was thus employed until 1852 when he came to Berwick and worked for Jackson & Woodin two and a half years. He then rented their foundry and did all the manufacturing of plows, threshing machines, etc., for twelve years. In 1864 he engaged in mercantile business which he has since carried on, with the exception of two years he was engaged in running a foundry and manufacturing agricultural implements. He owns several small farms and a great deal of town property, also some in Nescopeck. In December, 1850, he married Hannah HAGENBUCH. Mr. BOWER has also been extensively engaged in the real estate business. He and his wife are members of the Evangelical Association, to which he has belonged for thirty-eight years.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg 384)

EDMUND J. BOWMAN, Berwick, was born in Briarcreek Township, Columbia Co., Penn., December 21, 1835; a son of Jesse and Anna (BROWN) BOWMAN. His grandfather, the Rev. Thomas BOWMAN, Sr., was born in Bucks County in 1760, and in 1782 married Mary TREAS, of Northampton County. in April, 1793, he and his family left the old farm at Mount Bethel, traveling by wagon via Mauch Chunk, Nazareth and Leigh, to make their new home in a wilderness country. They settled in Briarcreek Township, Columbia county, and occupied, temporarily, a log house near the site of the three-story PILKINGTON dwelling, situated upon the public road leading from Berwick to Orangeville. The grandfather was a Methodist preacher, whose talents were of a commanding order. Socially, he was very agreeable; humorous, apt at anecdote, keen in argument, ready of utterance and quick at repartee, and in a public address he was often powerful. Subject's father was the fourth son and child and was in his fifth year when his parents moved to Briarcreek. The next year he began to attend school and succeeded in acquiring a practical education. After his marriage he lived in Briarcreek eleven years, when he moved to Berwick Plains in 1820. Two years later the Rev. John THOMAS, who was then preacher in charge of Northumberland Circuit, appointed him class leader of a little society composed of the pious neighbors who gathered on Sundays to hold prayer-meetings, Sunday-school and class meetings. In 1829 he was transferred to Berwick, where he continued his leadership until the close of his life, a period of almost fifty consecutive years. For fifteen years he had the chief management of the camp-meetings at a time when the ruder elements of society opposed Methodism in the spirit of hatred. He was held in high esteem by the entire community by whom he was called "Uncle Jesse." He was a director of a State bank at Danville for many years and also of the national Bank at Berwick, and through his personal efforts with the Legislature of Pennsylvania, a subsidy of $10,000 was secured from the State for the building of the present bridge across the Susquehanna River, at Berwick. In 1821 he was appointed captain of the first company of the Second Brigade, Eighth Division of the State Militia. He was recognized as a pioneer in the matter of higher education, and was among the first in the community to give his children a classical education. He was a member of the board of trustees of Dickinson College about 1847. In 1849 he sold his farm and moved to Berwick, resolved to live retired. He died in 1880, his wife's death occurring four years prior. The BOWMANS were among the early settlers of the county and have been a noted family in its history. Our subject's maternal grandfather, Robert, with his brother, John BROWN, were among the founders of Berwick, closely following Evan OWEN. Robert had three children: John, who died young; Anna, who married Jesse BOWMAN, and Sarah, who became the wife of a Mr. HICKS and settled in Salem Township, Luzerne County. Edmund J. BOWMAN, our subject, is the youngest of his father's family and early evinced a taste for intellectual pursuits. He received liberal educational advantages, having attended Williamsport Dickinson Seminary; later graduated from Dickinson college, and at one time attained considerable local fame as a public speaker. In his public lectures his subjects were well chosen and evidenced broad reading. In a recent newspaper notice he is spoken of as "one of the finest lecturers in the State." He never chose a profession, but as his pen productions were of a high order, he figured somewhat as a contributor and correspondent of the public journals. For some years his occupation was that of a school-teacher, and he served his country as a soldier in the civil war. He owns 160 acres of land, also property in Kansas City, Mo. He is the only member of the family unmarried.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg 385)

ROBERT S. BOWMAN, postmaster, Berwick, was born in Centre Township, Columbia Co., Penn., July 8, 1858, a son of D. A. and Jane S. (CLARK) BOWMAN, natives of Pennsylvania. The latter, of Irish extraction, was a descendant of the Clarks of Revolutionary fame, her grandfather being a colonel during that struggle. Our subject's great-great-grandfather, who spelled his name BAUMANN, came to this country from Germany when thirteen years of age. The grandfather, Jesse BOWMAN, was born in Northampton County, but came to this county in the latter part of the last century, took a large tract of land, and was among the first settlers of the place. He followed farming, and died in 1828. Our subject's father was born in Columbia County in 1803; was reared on a farm, and followed agricultural pursuits. He was twice married, and was the father of eight children, three by his first wife and five by his second. Six of the children still survive: Caroline, Sarah A. (wife of Thomas F. SCHUYLER), Charles S., George D. (married to Kate KERNS), John A. (married to Annie LARGE), Robert S. (married to Mary Isadore GILROY). The deceased are Ezekiel and Jesse G. The father died in 1877, but the mother is still living, and resides in Mifflinville. Robert S., our subject, was reared on a farm until twelve years of age, when his parents moved to the town of Mifflinville. There he attended school until he was eighteen years of age, when he entered the Republican office at Bloomsburg. He served a three years' apprenticeship, and at the age of twenty-one, in 1879, came to Berwick and bought out the Berwick Independent. Mr. BOWMAN was appointed postmaster at Berwick, under Arthur's administration, and took charge of the office in that month. October 13, 1881, he married Mary Isadore GILROY, a native of Berwick, and their union has been blessed with two children: Roy W. and Clark A. Mr. BOWMAN is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and Mrs. BOWMAN of the Baptist.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg 385)

JONAS CRISMAN, miller, P. O. Berwick, was born in Warren County, N. J., March 4, 1831, a son of Jacob and Margaret (HILL) CRISMAN, natives of Warren County, N. J., and of English-German descent. His grandfather came from Germany, settled in New Jersey, built the first grist-mill in Warren County, and was extensively engaged in milling. He shipped flour to all parts of the country, but chiefly to Philadelphia. He was very wealthy, and at his death his property was divided among his ten children. Our subject's maternal grandfather, Gen. HILL, came from England and settled in New Jersey. He was obliged to flee from his native country on account of siding with the colonies, and, after arriving in America, served in the Revolution under Washington. After the close of that struggle he built a mill and followed milling. Our subject's father was born in Warren County, N. J., in 1795; was reared on a farm and engaged in milling, which he followed all his life. He served in the war of 1812, and while rejoicing over the election of President Harrison, in 1841, he was accidentally killed by the explosion of a cannon. He was the father of ten children, five of whom survive: three reside in New Jersey, one in California, and one in Pennsylvania. Jonas CRISMAN was reared to the miller's trade, which he followed in New Jersey until coming to this State. He owned two or three grist-mills in New Jersey, and followed milling extensively. In 1883 he sold out, came to Columbia County, and purchased the grist-mill which he is now operating. He also has the contract to run the stage from Berwick to Conyngham. In October, 1855, he married Ellen GRAY, a native of New Jersey, and six children were born to them: Annie (wife of F. P. FREAS), John (married to Mary LINABERRY), Frederick, Frank, George and Virgil H. Mrs. CRISMAN is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. CRISMAN is a F. & A. M. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg 386)

B. F. CRISPIN, Jr., teller of the First National Bank, Berwick, was born in Philadelphia July 21, 1847, a son of Benjamin F. and Elizabeth R. (GLENN) CRISPIN, natives of Philadelphia, and of English descent. His father was born August 1, 1824, and educated in Philadelphia, where he has always resided. Our subject was reared and educated in Philadelphia, and during the great excitement in oil circles, being then eighteen years old, he took charge of his father's business, while the latter was absent in the oil regions. He remained with his father until 1870, when he engaged as a partner in the firm of Longacre & Co., in the printing and lithographing business. Thus he remained until the mill closed in January, 1873. He then entered the First National Bank as teller, and in 1880 was elected one of the directors. In the spring of that year he engaged in the iron business under the firm name of Jackson Bros. & Crispin, in the manufacture of charcoal, pig iron, etc., in which he is still interested, the business being now conducted under the firm name of Jackson Iron Co. Mr. CRISPIN married, in 1873, Maggie, daughter of M. W. and Margaret (GEARHART) JACKSON. Mr. and Mrs. CRISPIN are the parents of three children: M. Jackson, Clarence G. and Helen. The parents are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. CRISPIN is a member of the Masonic fraternity.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg 386)

R. G. CRISPIN, merchant, Berwick, was born in Philadelphia, Penn., a son of B. F. and Elizabeth (GLENN) CRISPIN, both natives of Philadelphia, and of English-Welsh descent. His ancestors came over from England in 1652, with William PENN, and located in Philadelphia. The grandfather, Benjamin, was born in Philadelphia, and there learned the saddler's trade, which he followed in his youth. In the prime of life he became quite a politician; somewhere about 1840 was speaker of the Senate and also served as lieutenant-governor for some years. His latter years he spent in retirement, having amassed a fortune. Our subject's father was also born in Philadelphia, and there attended school. He served as public weigher in that city for many years, and still resides there. Our subject, the third of eight children, was reared in Philadelphia until twenty-one years of age, and there received his education. At the age of seventeen he engaged in the insurance business, which he followed until leaving the city. In 1870 he came to Berwick and engaged in mercantile business, which he has since followed. He carries a general stock of dry goods, boots, shoes, groceries, etc., valued at $7,000. In September, 1873, he married Fannie BOWMAN, a native of Columbia County.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg 386)

EMMOR DIETTERICH, farmer, P. O. Berwick, was born in Centre Township July 7, 1821, a son of Lewis and Elizabeth (HOOFNAGLE)DIETTERICH, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. His great-grandfather came from Germany and settled in Northampton County, Penn., where he resided until his death. He was among the first settlers of that county. His son, Jacob, was a farmer and came to Columbia County in 1800, and settled in Centre Township. He owned a large tract of land, all timber, which required many years of labor to clear. He was a strong Democrat in politics, and was sixty-four years old at the time of his death. Subject's father was only ten years old when his parents came to this county, and he used to take the grain on horseback to the old RITTENHOUSE mill. He was a carpenter by trade, which he followed all his life as long as he was able to work. He was the father of five children: Emmor, Stephen and Sarah (wife of Andrew TERWILLIGER), living, and Phoebe and Elias, deceased (the latter served in the civil war and died a short time after his discharge). Our subject was reared on a farm and has followed agricultural pursuits since he was seventeen years old. He farmed for his father until he was twenty-four years old, and then farmed on shares until he was twenty-eight. He bought the farm where he now resides in 1870, and owns seventy acres of good land in Briarcreek Township. He married, March 4, 1849, Mary MOSTELLER, and four children were born to them, two of whom are living: Edella and Dora, wife of Warren TERWILLIGER. The deceased are Clark and Lewis H. Mr. and Mrs. DIETTERICH are members of the Lutheran Church. He has served as school director, auditor, judge of elections and inspector, and was supervisor eleven terms.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg 387)

B. F. DREISBACH, dealer in pianos, organs and sewing machines, Berwick, was born in Roaringcreek Township, Columbia Co., Penn., October 30, 1837, a son of Nathan and Sarah (LEVAN) DREISBACH, natives of Pennsylvania and of German-French descent. His great-grandfather came from Germany and settled first in Philadelphia, and after several years immigrated to Northampton County, where he died. Subject's maternal great-grandfather came from France and resided in the Wyoming Valley during the Indian massacre. Our subject's great-grandmother was captured by the Indians in the cabin. The great-grandmother was taken into Ohio and had tried to make her escape several times, but was always unsuccessful. She was compelled to marry the Indian chief, and bore him two sons. While the Indians were on a trading trip she made her escape. Yost DREISBACH, subject's grandfather, settled in Salem Township, Luzerne County, in 1800, and was a millwright, which trade he followed most of his life. He bought a large tract of land in Roaringcreek, about 1,000 acres, which he divided among his children. Nathan DREISBACH has followed millwrighting all his life, which was the occupation of his ancestors. He now resides in Jonestown, this county, and is now engaged in mercantile business. He reared a family of eight children, six living: Mrs. FORNIGER, Benjamin F., Mrs. KUNKLE, Mrs. HOSLER, Nathaniel and Albert. Our subject was reared on a farm until about two years of age, when he resided eight years in Kerntown, where his father was engaged in mercantile business. He then lived with his uncle, John P. LEVAN, four years, and later went to Ashland, Schuylkill County, where he clerked for fourteen years and had an interest in the business for two years. He was for three years in partnership with R. P. BELLMAN, and then sold out on account of ill health and moved to Conyngham, Luzerne County, where he engaged in mercantile business three years. In the spring of 1877 he moved to Berwick, where he has since been engaged in his present business. He was employed as traveling salesman for a dry goods house in Philadelphia three years, and also dealt in musical instruments. He married January 7, 1867, Doretta DISTLEHURST, and they are both members of the Lutheran Church. He is also a member of the I. O. O. F. and of the G. A. R. In 1862 he enlisted in Company C, Sixth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served three months; then re-enlisted, this time in Company C, Fifty-first Regiment, and served one year. He was then drafted, but paid a substitute. He participated in the battles of Antietam, Gettysburg, Chancellorsville, Fredericksburg and several skirmishes. He was postmaster at Conyngham, Luzerne County, three years.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg 387)

J. W. EVANS, insurance agent, Berwick, was born July 7, 1845, at Evansville, this county, a son of George and Rebecca (SHELLENBARGER) EVANS, natives of Columbia County, and of Welsh descent on the father's side and German on the mother's. The first of the family settled in Briarcreek Township the latter part of the last century, and his grand-father, James EVANS, was the first millwright of the county. He built nearly all the old mills in this county, and also owned a large tract of land. Our subject's father learned the millwright's trade, which he followed a number of years, then learned the tanner's trade and built a tannery at Evansville, following the business until his death in 1870. His widow died in 1880. Our subject received a liberal education. At the breaking out of the Rebellion, when a mere lad, he enlisted in the One Hundred and Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, in Capt. J. M. BUCKALEW'S (a brother of the Hon. Charles R. BUCKALEW of Bloomsburg) company. He rendered gallant service to his country in the ranks, where he served fourteen months, and was then honorably discharged. At the close of his soldier experience he went to Hazelton and entered the large mercantile house of William KISNER, remaining three years; then he went to Wyoming Seminary, at Kingston, taking a full three years' course of study. Upon his graduation from this excellent institution he received the appointment of teller of the First National Bank of Berwick, in which capacity he served seven years with distinction as a financier and accountant. In 1877 he established the now well known Berwick Insurance Agency, which, by the way, is the most reliable and largest agency in Columbia County. Only old and well established fire, marine and life insurance companies are represented by Mr. EVANS. He has had quite a number of heavy losses in each of these departments of insurance, which have been promptly and satisfactorily adjusted. at present he offers perfect security in the following first-classed companies: Aetna of Hartford, Liverpool and London and Globe, Commercial Union of London, Phoenix of Hartford, Fire Association of Philadelphia, Aetna Life of Hartford, Springfield of Missouri, Fire and Marine. Any information by mail or otherwise will receive prompt attention by addressing Mr. EVANS. He also is largely interested in real estate transactions in this town. He has laid out and is offering for sale some very fine building lots at the upper end of Market Street, a suburb of Berwick. Mr. EVANS is the president of the home Young Men's Christian Association, and a leading member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a gentleman of fine business and social qualities, having hosts of friends at home and abroad, won by a genial disposition and uniform courtesy which always mark the true gentleman. He married, November 15, 1871, Anna E., daughter of Rev. Jared H. and Sarah B. YOUNG. Mr. and Mrs. EVANS are the parents of five children, one living-John Harrison. The deceased are Daisy B., aged seven years; Sarah Y., aged five and a half years; Anna F., aged four and a half years, and an infant son. Mrs. EVANS is also a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the I. O. O. F. Lodge, and has passed all the chairs.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg 387)

CHARLES C. EVANS, attorney, Berwick, was born in Briarcreek Township, Columbia Co., Penn., January 10, 1858, a son of Francis and Jane (LAMON) EVANS, natives of Pennsylvania, and of Welsh and Irish descent. His great-grandfather came from Wales, and his grandfather, James EVANS, was born in this county in 1799. The latter was a millwright by trade, which he followed most of his life, and built nearly all the grist-mills in the neighborhood, some of which are still standing. He also was interested in agriculture, but never followed it extensively. He built and owned an oil-mill near Evansville, and died in Luzerne County, in June, 1879, in the eighteenth year of his age. Our subject's father was reared on a farm and followed agricultural pursuits extensively until 1885, when he moved into Berwick, and is now leading a retired life. Charles C. was reared on the farm and attended the district school until 1874, when he attended the State normal school two years. In the winter of 1876-77 he taught school in the township of Briarcreek, and in the fall of 1877 went to Lafayette College, where he graduated in June, 1881. He then entered the office of the Hon. Simon P. WOLVERTON, of Sunbury, and read law under him for two years. July 14, 1883, he was admitted to practice in several courts of Northumberland County, and was subsequently admitted to the bars of Columbia and Luzerne Counties. August 23, 1883, he opened a law office in Berwick, where he has since remained. Mr. EVANS is a man of fine intellect and well fitted for the profession he has chosen. He is a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity and of the Presbyterian Church.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 388)

JOHN M. FAIRCHILD, farmer, P. O. Berwick, was born in Newport Township, Luzerne Co., Penn., October 6, 1852, a son of John and Martha (LINE) FAIRCHILD, natives of Luzerne County, and of German descent. His grandfather, Solomon FAIRCHILD, came from Connecticut, and settled in Luzerne County, Penn., where he followed agriculture all his life. Our subject's father also followed farming, and the farm owned by him, on which he first settled in Luzerne County, is now cut up into town lots for part of Nanticoke. He was the father of six children, four of whom are living: Henry, Alfred, Martha (wife of O. F. FERRIS) and John M. The last named was reared on a farm, and remained with his parents until their deaths. He then took the homestead and lived on it until the spring of 1886, when he moved to Columbia County. Here he bought 148 acres where he now resides, in Briarcreek Township, and which are well improved. He has been twice married; first, in 1878, to Nettie CURTIS, who died April 7, 1882; second occasion, January 27, 1884, to Clara B. WOLFE, who has borne him two children: Willie J. and Wesley B. Mrs. FAIRCHILD is a member of the Reformed Church.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 387)

OLAF F. FERRIS, farmer, was born in Mehoopany Township, Wyoming Co., Penn., March 21, 1848, a son of Simeon and Hiley (JUNE) FERRIS, natives, respectively, of Connecticut and New Jersey. The former moved to New Jersey, where he married and engaged in farming many years. He then immigrated to Wyoming County about 1820, bought a farm, and there resided until his death in 1875. He was the father of twelve children: Apollos, David L., Michael (deceased), Harriet (deceased), Jane, Henry (deceased), Levi (deceased), Emily, Charles (deceased), Clarissa, Olaf F. and Simeon (deceased). Henry died in the service of his country, and Levi was killed at the battle of Fair Oaks, may 31, 1862. Charles also died in the army. Olaf F. was reared on a farm, and remained at home until twenty-one years of age. He then commenced to learn the carpenter's trade, and followed it in Luzerne County, having moved to Nanticoke in the spring of 1870. In March, 1885, he moved to Columbia county, and bought 150 acres of valuable land about one-half mile from Berwick. There he built a large two-story house about a year prior to moving into it, and also owns another house on his farm which he rents. Since then he has bought an adjoining farm of 133 acres, with good buildings. He was engaged in mercantile business in Nanticoke for about four years, and still owns an interest in it. He married, in January, 1875, Martha L. FAIRCHILD, who bore him four children: Ada A., John H., Martha E. and Olaf C. Mr. and Mrs. FERRIS are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity, K. T. and Grange. While living in Luzerne County he was a member of the town council. He has passed all the chairs in the Masonic lodge. He is also a member of the I. O. O. F., having passed all the chairs in the lodge. He has represented the Masonic lodge for two years in the Grand Lodge.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 387)

FREAS FOWLER, farmer, P. O. Berwick, was born in Briarcreek Township, may 25, 1830, a son of Gilbert and Sarah (FREAS) FOWLER, natives of the same township. His grandfather, Daniel _____ came from New York State and located in Briarcreek in 1775, and was among the early settlers of that place. He bought a large tract of land, most of which was in timber, and the place now occupied by our subject was all scrubby pine trees, but is now one of the best farms in the neighborhood. Gilbert FOWLER was born in 1792, and always made Briarcreek Township his home. He followed farming, and owned at one time about 500 acres. He was the father of seven children, four of whom are now living: Andrew, Freas, Charles and Lyman. Gilbert died in January, 1885, and his wife in 1878. Freas FOWLER was reared on the farm, and received his education in Berwick. He remained at home until twenty-two years of age, when he went into business with his brother-in-law, keeping hotel at Berwick. He served as constable and collector of Berwick five years. In 1862 he took the homestead farm, and has since been engaged in agricultural pursuits, and in 1882 bought the farm, which consists of 129 acres of fine land. In 1858 Mr. FOWLER married Sarah HAGENBUCH, a native of this county, and one child blessed their union, Ida A. Mr. and Mrs. FOWLER and daughter are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1879 Mr. Freas FOWLER was elected as one of the vice-presidents of the Columbia County Agricultural, Horticultural and Mechanical Association, in which he served four successive years, and in 1883 was elected as president of the same association, in which he served three years successively.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 388)

F. P. HILL, M. D., physician and surgeon, Berwick, was born in Centre Township, Columbia County, February 12, 1853, a son of John and Mercy (HOFFMAN) HILL, settled in Centre Township the latter part of the last century. His grandfather, Frederick HILL, settled in Centre Township the latter part of the last century. His grandfather HOFFMAN moved to Berwick, where he lived during the latter part of his life. Our subject's father followed farming in Centre Township until 1872, when he moved to Berwick, bought property and there has since resided. He was the father of eleven children, eight of whom are living: Sarah, wife of Wesley FORTNER; William, Phoebe, Ezra B., Thomas G., Alice M., Hester A. and Frank B. Our subject was reared on a farm until sixteen years of age, and attended and taught school until he was twenty years of age. He took a course at Bloomsburg State Normal School and Williamsport Dickinson Seminary, where he graduated at the age of nineteen. He also took a course at the Wyoming Seminary, Kingston. In 1873 he came to Berwick and entered the office of Dr. R. H. LITTLE as a student, and there remained until he completed his medical course in the spring of 1876. He graduated at Jefferson Medical College in 1876, after which he became a partner with his preceptor, Dr. R. H. LITTLE, and contiuued [sic] practice with him until his death in January, 1885. Since then Dr. HILL has been alone and has a large and lucrative practice both as a surgeon and physician. He married in March, 1886, Hattie WESLEY, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 388)

M. L. HOUSKNECHT, farmer, was born in Columbia County, Penn., April 2, 1840, a son of Solomon and Mary (MILLER) HOUSKNECHT, both natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. His grandfather, Martin HOUSKNECHT, was born in Northampton county and moved to Luzerne County after his marriage, where he bought a farm near Butler and resided until his death. Our subject's father was born in Northampton County and has followed cabinet-making the most of his life. He resided in Bloomsburg about fourteen years and on the farm about six years. In 1875 he moved to Berwick, where he still resides, and is now in his seventy-first year. His wife is living also, in her seventieth year. They were the parents of three children; of these our subject is the only survivor. He was reared in Mifflinville and there received a part of his education. He entered a store as clerk when he was fourteen years of age, and remained until he was twenty-nine. He also attended school at Bloomsburg and Union Seminary, New Berlin. In 1869 he moved to where he now resides, purchased a farm, and has since followed agricultural pursuits. He married in November, 1862, Annie M. HOSLER, and seven children were born to them: Mary E., John S. (a bookkeeper in Philadelphia and a graduate of the College of Philadelphia), Fannie, Ezra, Addie, Freas B. and Charles C. Mr. and Mrs. HOUSKNECHT are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He has served as auditor and assessor.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 388)

M. W. JACKSON, proprietor of the rolling-mill, car shops, wheel foundry and manufacturer of castings, etc., Berwick, his native place, was born January 28, 1815, a son of J. C. and Elizabeth (DOANE) JACKSON. His father was a native of Goshen, N. Y., and his mother of Chester County, Penn., and of the Quaker faith. His grandfather, Benjamin DOANE, was born in Chester county, and immigrated to Columbia county in the latter part of the last century, settled at Berwick and followed his trade, that of a tailor, until his death in 1845. Our subject's father came to his place in the early part of the present century, and here resided until his death, in 1850. Our subject was reared in Berwick and educated at such schools as the neighborhood afforded in his youth. He began life for himself without a dollar, acting as clerk in a store for about six years. While in this position he gained a little more knowledge of business ways and determined to embark in some business of his own. In 1840, in connection with George MACK, he started a foundry on a small scale for the manufacture of plows and plow castings, kettles and almost everything that farmers would want. The present site of his dwelling was at that time an orchard, and Berwick was very small. The partnership continued three years when Mr. JACKSON bought out Mr. MACK and took in Robert McCURDY as a partner, and continued thus about three years. He then bought out Mr. McCURDY and continued the business alone up to 1849, when he took in W. H. WOODIN as a partner, and the firm continued under the name of JACKSON & WOODIN up to 1872. The name was then changed to The JACKSON & WOODIN Manufacturing Company, and incorporated under the laws of the Legislature, with Clarence G. JACKSON and C. R. WOODIN as the active men, our subject and Mr. WOODIN retiring from active business. Mr. JACKSON's son died May 3, 1880, but the stock is still retained by the family. The company is now organized with C. R. WOODIN, president; G. MALLORY, vice-president; Charles H. ZEHNDER, secretary, and M. W. JACKSON and W. H. WOODIN, executive committee. The foundry was first started on a very small scale, doing a business for the first few years of about $10,000 to $20,000 per annum. In 1866 the buildings were all destroyed by fire but were immediately rebuilt. The firm worked night and day and their business increased very rapidly until now they do about $1,500,000 per year, and give employment too about 1,200 men when running at full capacity. The firm also own and operate a large store and do a business from $100,000 to $125,000 per annum. The capacity of the rolling-mill is forty to fifty tons per day of finished iron or merchant bar iron. The car wheel factory manufactures from 150 to 200 wheels per day, and in connection with the wheel foundry they manufacture all kinds of castings. The pipe factory runs twenty-five to thirty tons per day, from three to twelve inches in diameter, used for water and gas. When the works are run under full capacity, 140 to 150 tons of pig iron per day are used. This gives some idea of the work done by them. The car shops have a capacity of twenty cars per day. Mr. JACKSON has one of the finest residence properties in the borough, beautifully located, and by industry and economy he has amassed quite a fortune. He has been twice married; first in 1839, to Margaret GEARHART, granddaughter of Judge GEARHART, a native of Northumberland County, who bore him seven children, two living: Margaret Jackson (wife of B. F. CRISPIN, Jr.) and Frank R. (married to Miss AMMERMAN). Mrs. JACKSON died in 1871, and our subject next married in 1877, Mrs. Mary (SHULZE) GOTWALT, niece of Gov. J. Andrew SHULZE, of Pennsylvania, who has borne him one child, Mary Woodin. Mr. and Mrs. JACKSON are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is president of the First National Bank, and owns about 1,200 acres of land, and is quite extensively engaged in farming. He is one of the most popular men in Berwick, standing very high in the estimation of all who have had the pleasure of his acquaintance.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 390)

COL. CLARENCE G. JACKSON, deceased, was born march 25, 1842, in Berwick, where he spent his early years. He was a son of M. W. and Margaret (GEARHART) JACKSON. At the age of fourteen he entered Dickinson Seminary at Williamsport, where, two years later, he graduated with the highest honors of his class. He then entered Dickinson College, Carlisle, where, at the age of eighteen he graduated at the head of his class. After his college career he returned home, where he remained during the eventful period covering the beginning of the civil war. At the age of twenty years he felt that it was his duty to aid his country and entered the service, August 2, 1862, as second lieutenant of Company H, Eighty-fourth Regiment. January 2, of the following year, he was promoted first lieutenant, and passed safely through many sanguinary battles. At Chancellorsville he was captured by the enemy and taken to Libby Prison, where he remained many months, but not without making a daring attempt at escaping. He with his companions succeeded in getting away from the prison to the country, but he was captured and brought back. Later he was exchanged and appointed to a captaincy, serving in that capacity until the close of the war. At the battle of the Wilderness he was wounded and again taken prisoner and returned to that prison from which he had been released but a short time before. His stay, however, was short, for he was included among 600 officers that were taken to Charleston and placed under fire of the Federal cannon that thundered on them from Ft. Moultrie. From Charleston they were taken to Columbia and placed in a guarded field, with no roof to shelter them, and where they dug underground cells for themselves. our subject was finally exchanged and returned home to engage in a more peaceful occupation. In 1870 he was appointed major on Gen. OSBORNE's staff and later promoted to colonel on Gov. HARTRANFT's staff. In 1879 he was honored by an appointment from Gov. HOYT, making him quartermaster-general, which office he held at the time of his death. He was a delegate-elect to the convention at Chicago. Occasionally he appeared before the public as a lecturer, where he was always appreciated. At the time of his death he was vice-president of The JACKSON & WOODIN Manufacturing Company, president of the rolling-mill, a director of the First National Bank, and a member of the firms of JACKSON, WOODIN & JACKSON, bankers, and JACKSON Bros. & CRISPIN. He was a trustee of Dickinson College and of the State normal school at Bloomsburg, a director of the schools of Berwick, and a trustee of the Methodist Episcopal Church, all of which positions he creditably filled. He was liberal in thought and deed and a liberal friend of the laboring class. He had just completed a fine residence at an enormous expense, in which he resided one year before his death. The firms with which he was connected have lost an able, active associate, the church a valuable and liberal supporter, the town a progressive citizen, and the county a loyal, patriotic and brave soldier. February 1, 1866, he married Elizabeth SYBERT, by whom he had two children: Henrietta M. and Jane B. Mrs. JACKSON is a liberal supporter of Christianity and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 390)

FRANK R. JACKSON, a director of The JACKSON & WOODIN Manufacturing Company, was born in Berwick, November 10, 1850, a son of M. W. and Margaret (GEARHART) JACKSON, natives of Pennsylvania. He was reared in Berwick and remained at home until he became of age. He received his education at Berwick, Williamsport and Mechanicsburg. In 1870 he became interested in the firm of JACKSON & WOODIN, and still retains an interest in the same; in 1880 he bought a third interest in the JACKSON Iron Company in Union County, and is also one of the directors of the National Bank. He is treasurer of the County, and is also one of the directors of the National Bank. He is treasurer of the agricultural society and trustee of the Y. M. C. A. Mr. JACKSON married, September 3, 1873, Alice AMMERMAN, a native of Danville. They are the parents of one child, Catherine E. Mr. and Mrs. JACKSON are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a gentleman of fine education, very enterprising and has a host of friends.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 391)

CHARLES N. KISNER, druggist, Berwick, was born in Luzerne County, Penn., May 26, 1859, a son of Ruebert and Cordelia (SEYBERT) KISNER, natives of Luzerne County, and of German descent. His great-grandfather came from Germany, and first settled in one of the lower counties. His grandfather lived in Luzerne County and there followed farming. Reuben KISNER was also a farmer, owned a farm in Luzerne County and died in 1882. His widow is yet living on the old homestead near Berwick, in Luzerne County. Charles N. KISNER was reared on a farm until eighteen years of age when he engaged in the drug business in Berwick, where he remained two years. He then attended lectures at the college of pharmacy, Philadelphia, Penn., two terms. He then returned to Berwick where he has since been engaged in the drug business. He carries a stock valued at $3,500 and has a half interest in the business, his partner being I. E. GROVE, who resides in Philadelphia.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 391)

LEVI KURTZ, or more properly spelt KUTZ, was born in Fork Township, Northampton Co., Penn., March 30, 1825, a son of Henry and Charity (SNYDER) KUTZ, natives of Pennsylvania. He is of German extraction, his great-grandfather having emigrated from Germany and being one of the early settlers of Pennsylvania. The father of the subject of this sketch served with honor in the war of 1812; he died in 1830, in the sixty-fifth year of his age, in Northampton County, Penn. There were ten children in the family of whom Levi and five older than he-Henry, Millie (wife of Frederick ULLMER, residing in New Jersey), Jeremiah, William and Samuel-survived the father. In 1843, when nineteen years old, Levi came to Columbia County, then thinly settled, and began the world for himself. Having saved enough to buy a small farm, he followed the plow for twelve years. He traded the farm for a store in Foundryville, Columbia County, in 1858; but subsequently moved his store to Evansville, same county, where he remained until 1862, when he disposed of his store and removed to Berwick. In 1870 he established the Berwick Marble & Granite Works. In 1879 he took his son, Jennings U., into partnership and the firm is now known as L. KURTZ & Son. In April, 1844, Mr. KURTZ married Elizabeth, daughter of Daniel and Annie (MOORE) SCHLABACH. Twelve children were born to their union, of whom six are living: C. Lousia, Jennings U., D. Morris, Annie S., Kittie E. and S. Burton.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 391)

GEORGE P. LEARN, retired farmer, was born in Luzerne County, February 7, 1819, a son of George and Mary Catherine LEARN. His grandfather, Jacob LEARN, was born in Northampton County, Penn., and lived and died in that county. He followed farming, and as the country was in a wild state, he had many difficulties to contend against. Indians were also numerous, and his wife and brother were killed by them. George LEARN, our subject's father, was born in Northampton County in August, 1788, and resided there with his parents until he was twenty-six years of age. He then moved to Luzerne County, where he engaged in farming until his death, at the age of sixty-two years. He married Mary Catherine DREHER, an aunt to Judge DREHER, of Monroe County. Our subject resided in Hanover, his native township, until he was forty-seven years of age, and then moved to Columbia County. March 21, 1850, he married Lenora KELLER, who bore him five children: Henry Clinton, married Rhoda LAUBACH; John M., married Mary Jane MOWREER; Alexander JAMESON, married Ida HESS; Mary S., wife of W. S. ASH, and Augustus Frederick, all of whom reside in Columbia County. Mr. LEARN has served as overseer of the poor and school director. He and Mrs. LEARN are members of the Reformed Church.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 391)

M. LEVY, clothing merchant, Berwick, was born in Alsace, France (now Germany), April 2, 1852, a son of Joseph and Mary (WOOG) LEVY, natives of France. His father is still living in his native country, engaged in the mercantile business, which he has followed since a boy, and is now sixty-eight years old. He is the father of seven children, five of whom are living: Emanuel, Marx, Caroline, Jeanette and Flora. The deceased are David and Elise. Marx, our subject, was engaged in the mercantile business with his father in France until 1872, when in the fall of that year he took passage on the steamer "Queen," and after a voyage of seventeen days landed in the City of New York. There he remained one year, engaged in mercantile business. He was then employed by a New York dry goods house and sent west to travel, his points being Chicago., St. Louis and New Orleans, and all the large cities, and was thus engaged about five years. He then went to Philadelphia, where he was engaged about two years in mercantile business. In the fall of 1883 he came to Berwick and engaged in the clothing trade, which he still follows. He carries a general line of clothing, boots, shoes, hats, caps, trunks, etc., his stock being valued at about $7,000, insured. In March, 1882, he married Rosa DUKES, a native of San Francisco, Cal. They are the parents of three children, two of whom are living: Mabel and Arthur. Mr. LEVY is a member of the Free Sons, and he and wife are of the Jewish faith.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 392)

SHADRACK L. MCBRIDE, Berwick, was born in Columbia County, January 29, 1825, a son of Hugh and Mary (MACK) McBRIDE, natives of Pennsylvania, and of Irish descent on the paternal side. Hugh McBRIDE was born near Danville; has always followed farming and now resides in Luzerne County, retired from active life. He was the father of seven children, four of whom are living: S. L., Sallie, Roxana and Margaret. Our subject was reared on a farm and followed agricultural pursuits until 1861, when he came to Berwick, and has since been in the employ of The JACKSON & WOODIN Manufacturing Company for fifteen years. He married, in 1854, Caroline A. TAYLOR, and two children were born to their union: Fannie, wife of Thomas W. SHERWOOD, and Samuel H., married to Martha HENRY. Mr. and Mrs. McBRIDE are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 392)

GARRICK MALLERY, vice-president of The JACKSON & WOODIN Manufacturing Company, Berwick, was born in Mechanicsburg, Cumberland Co., Penn. His father, Garrick V. MALLERY, a native of Jefferson County, N. Y., resided in Cumberland County, Penn., at his death in 1864, and was a nephew of Judge Garrick MALLERY, who lived for a time at Wilkesbarre; was afterward judge of Berks County, and for many years a resident of Philadelphia. Our subject was reared and educated in Mechanicsburg, and came to Berwick in July, 1864. He entered the store of The JACKSON & WOODIN Manufacturing Company as clerk, which position he held until January 5, 1865. He was then promoted bookkeeper of the company, and retained that position until the reorganization of the firm in 1872. He was then made treasurer, which position he held until December, 1882, when he was made vice-president of the company, and has since served as such, giving entire satisfaction. He married in October, 1872, Helen A. HOYT, a native of Columbia County, who has borne him three children, two living-Garrick, Jr., and Pauline; the deceased one was named Earnest. Mr. and Mrs. MALLERY are members respectively of the Methodist Episcopal and Presbyterian Churches.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 392)

W. ELLIS MICHAEL, dentist, Berwick, was born in Briarcreek Township, Columbia Co., Penn., August 20, 1857, a son of Stephen and Sarah A. (GENSEL) MICHAEL, natives of Columbia County and of German descent. His grandfather came from some of the lower counties and settled in this county in the latter part of the last century. Our subject's father was brought up on a farm and followed agricultural pursuits all his life. When he married he moved to his present place, where he has since remained; he bought 200 acres of land but has since divided it up, his sons purchasing a part of the homestead. Our subject was reared on a farm and attended school until sixteen years of age. In the spring of 1881 he entered the Philadelphia Dental College and graduated in the spring of 1883. In the spring of 1884 he located in Berwick, where he has since practiced. Prior to entering the dental college he attended and taught school. He married, February 14, 1884, Laura McHENRY. Mr. MICHAEL is an enterprising gentleman and he and his wife are members of the Christian Church.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 392)

GEORGE W. MILLER, farmer, was born in Maine Township, Columbia Co., Penn., April 15, 1839, a son of David and Susanna (EATON) MILLER, natives of Mifflin Township and of German descent. His paternal grandfather came from New Jersey and settled in Mifflin Township in the latter part of the last century, where he bought a farm and resided until his death. His father was born in 1812 and remained in Mifflin Township until 1851, when he moved to where George W. now resides, and died March 28, 1873. His widow is yet living in her seventy-fifth year. George W. was reared on a farm and remained with his parents until he was twenty-two years of age. He was engaged by Reuben MILLER as a traveling salesman, with whom he remained two years. His farm where he has always resided, contains 216 acres. He married in 1860 Mary A. SITLER, and seven children blessed their union, six of whom are living: Dora, Della P., Catharine A., Gertrude, Elizabeth and Robert C. Mrs. MILLER is a member of the Evangelical Church.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 392)

HUDSON OWEN, superintendent of the Pennsylvania Canal of the Wyoming division, was born in Orange County, N. Y., January 25, 1811, a son of William and Nancy (McCORD) OWEN, the latter a native of Ireland. His father was a native of Orange County, N. Y., but of Welsh descent. He was a tanner by trade and followed the business during the early part of his life. He owned a tannery and property in Middletown, N. Y. In 1819 he sold out and moved to Wyoming county, where he bought a farm and resided until about three years before his death, when he went to live with his son, Hudson, at Berwick, where he died in 1855. His wife died in 1814. William OWEN served in the war of 1812 and belonged to the Light Horse Company. He was a life-long Democrat and a man of prominence in his day. He had a family of four children by his first wife, only one of whom is living-Hudson, and by his last wife had five sons, three of whom are living: John, in Washington Territory; Shubel, in Wisconsin, and Boyd, in Dodge Centre, Minn. Our subject was only three years old when his mother died, and at the age of sixteen he was employed by the Delaware Canal Company at Port Jervis, N. Y., where he remained about one year. He was then employed on the Juniata Canal for one year. In January, 1829, he went to Danville, Penn., and was employed by the Pennsylvania Canal Company and helped build the canal. He became foreman of one division and remained in that position until 1858, when he was appointed superintendent of the Wyoming division and has since remained as such. In 1836 he removed to Berwick, where he has since resided. When he moved to Danville he was appointed under a Democratic governor and it was necessary that the canal men should support that ticket, but when a Republican was elected, Mr. OWEN was still retained in his position. He began to work for the company as a laborer, and since 1829 has held nearly all the offices of the company. He married in July, 1837, Emily JACKSON, a sister of M. W. JACKSON. To them were born seven children, four living: Frances (deceased), who was married to Robert GILROY, a resident of Shickshinny, Luzerne County; Harriet, wife of Jerome WELCOTT, in Cold Water, Mich.; Sarah, wife of Jeremiah S. McMURTIE; Augusta, wife of Abner WELCH, and Ellen E., wife of H. D. ALBRIGHT, in Union County. Mrs. OWEN died in 1855, and in 1856 Mr. OWEN married Elizabeth JACKSON, a sister of his first wife, and five children were born to their union, four of whom are living: William, in Helena, Mont.; Kate, wife of Augustus SHUMAN, in Nescopeck; George and Annie. Mr. and Mrs. OWEN are members of the church. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity and the I. O. O. F. He has been town councilman and school director for a number of terms and has been a life-long Democrat.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 393)

MATTHIAS H. PETTY, farmer, was born in Wilkesbarre, Luzerne Co., Penn., November 25, 1832, a son of William and Lydia (STROH) PETTY, natives, respectively, of Northampton and Berks Counties and of French descent. His grandfather, John PETTY, came from Connecticut and settled in Northampton County, where he bought a farm and followed agriculture all his life. William PETTY was born January 31, 1787, was reared on a farm and followed lumber dealing for eleven years in Northampton County, where he owned a tract of timber land. He immigrated to Luzerne County in 1827 and engaged in farming for about ten years for Judge HOLLENBACH; he then moved to Pittston and farmed five years; he then bought a tract of land in Hanover Township, Luzerne County, erected a grist-mill, which he operated until some time before his death, when he sold it and lived retired. He died in 1869 aged eighty-three years. His wife, who was born in 1797, died in 1883. Both were consistent members of the German Reformed Church. They had four children, three now living: Levi, in Colorado; Amie, wife of Peter WAGNER, of Pittston, and Matthias H. (Peter is deceased). Our subject remained at home until twenty-three years of age, when he married. He farmed in Hanover Township, Luzerne County, fourteen years and then moved to Salem Township, same county. There he bought a farm and remained six years. In March, 1876, he moved to Columbia County and settled in Briarcreek Township, where he now resides. He bought a farm of sixty acres and has a fine residence, out-buildings, etc. He married December 28, 1854, Mary PELL, a native of Luzerne County, and ten children blessed their union: Hattie, wife of James E. SMITH; Amy; Samuel; William, a graduate of Long Island Hospital Medical College, Brooklyn, N. Y., and now a practicing physician; Charles M., Maggie, Mary, Lulu, Edith and Emma. Mr. and Mrs. PETTY are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the Grange and is overseer of the poor. While residing in Luzerne County he was justice of the peace one term.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 393)

DANIEL REEDY, mason, was born in Columbia County, Penn., May 14, 1835, a son of Peter and Leah (CLAUSE) REEDY, the former a native of Lehigh County, as was also his mother, and both of French-German descent. His grandfather, Peter REEDY, came from France and settled in Lehigh County, Penn., where he resided for several years. He was a local evangelist and often preached away from home. He came to Columbia County, bought a farm near the Montour line, and there spent the remainder of his life. Peter REEDY was quite young when his parents moved to this county. He followed carpentering all his life, and was accidentally killed by a falling tree in 1842. His widow is yet living at the age of seventy-nine years. They were the parents of six children, five of whom are living: Eliza, wife of Hiram KITCHEN, resides in this county; Daniel (subject); Jeremiah, residing in Michigan; Josiah, in Columbia County, and Peter, a resident of Berwick. The deceased one was named Mary. Mrs. REEDY is a member of the Lutheran Church, of which her husband was also a member. Our subject was only seven years old when his father died, and he was put out to wok for his board and clothes until he was thirteen. He then worked for two years at the rate of $3 per month, attending school in the winter. Until eighteen years old the highest wages he received was $8 per month. He then drove a team two years, hauling iron ore to Danville, and at this earned enough to take care of his mother. In 1855 he came to Berwick and learned the mason's trade and worked as journeyman for about ten years. He then, in 1870, began taking contracts for building in partnership with David BAUCHER, and so continued until 1879, when the partnership was dissolved. Mr. REEDY now has a good business and is doing well; he owns a fine residence in Berwick and also some land. In 1880 he took a pleasure trip west and was absent about two months. September 17, 1856, he married Martha J. HEAVNER, a native of Luzerne County, Penn. Eight children were born to them, seven of whom are living: Alice, wife of John D. CREARY; Lillie E., wife of S. A. PECK; John C., Harry R., William J., Sadie and Daniel. Jeremiah is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. REEDY are members of the Methodist Church. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., of the Masonic fraternity and is a K. T. He has served as a member of the Berwick school board and borough council several years; has also been assessor, treasurer and collector, and is treasurer of the board of managers of the Berwick fair.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 393)

M. H. RITTENHOUSE, farmer, P. O. Berwick, was born in Briarcreek on the old homestead, December 25, 1836, a son of Henry and Rachel (HULTON) RITTENHOUSE, natives of Columbia County. His grandfather, William RITTENHOUSE, came from Philadelphia to Columbia County in 1794, and settled in what is now Mifflinville. He and John KUNCKLE laid out Mifflinville and there remained a few years. In 1798 he removed to what is now Briarcreek Township and bought two tracts of land, which were patented; both contained about 700 acres. In 1800 he erected a grist-mill on the forks of Briarcreek and operated it a number of years. He also built a woolen factory and saw-mill, which he conducted until his death. The factory was destroyed by fire, but the old mill frame is still standing. He always had his farming done for him; was very successful and had a host of friends. He reared a family of six children. Of these Henry, subject's father, was the youngest and inherited the homestead, where he resided until his death, engaged in farming. He was born September 7, 1792, and died April 2, 1873. His wife was born in October, 1793, and died August 17, 1872. They were the parents of twelve children, eleven of whom are now living: Sarah, wife of Wesley EDDINGS; Mary, wife of John RITTENHOUSE; Enoch; Margaret, wife of Asa HULL; William; Uzilla, wife of John MOSTELLER; Elizabeth, wife of David KLINE; Hannah, wife of Wesley FREAS; Nehemiah; Fannie, wife of William L. FREAS and Morris H. Ann died July 12, 1881. Our subject, Morris H., was reared on a farm and remained home until his marriage, after which he resided seven years on the old homestead. In 1869 he moved to and bought the farm which he now owns and on which he still resides. He married July 31, 1860, Effie A., daughter of W. A. J. and Mary A. (CRAIG) BRITTAIN, who were both natives of this country. Mr. and Mrs. RITTENHOUSE are the parents of four children, three of whom survive: Henry, Gertrude and Mary. The deceased was named Hattie. Mrs. RITTENHOUSE's great-grandfather, Silas ENGEL, was among the early settlers of this county. He located in Briarcreek at a very early day and followed farming. He came here from Philadelphia, where he was educated for the legal profession, but which he never practiced, although he did a great deal of business for the people of his day.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 394)

THOMAS W. SHERWOOD, superintendent of rolling-mill, The JACKSON & WOODIN Manufacturing Co., Berwick, was born in Montour County, Penn., Feb. 3, 1856, a son of Eli and Ellen (KEMP) SHERWOOD, the latter a native of Pittsburgh and of English descent. His father was also a native of England and left his native country when he was twelve years of age. He settled with his parents near Danville when there were but a few houses in that place. He learned the puddler's trade in Danville and followed it until 1877, when he moved to Berwick, where he has since resided, and has charge of the puddling department when it is in operation. He is the father of eleven children, eight of whom are living: Thomas W., Mary, Joseph, Elizabeth, Benjamin, Anna, Bertha and Sallie. At the age of ten years our subject went to work in the ore mines, and after remaining there eight months left and went to school three months. He then went to work in the mills at Danville, at the age of eleven, carrying water for the puddlers two weeks. He then ran iron from the squeezer to the rolls about one year, and worked around the rolls five years in the same mill. He worked in Northumberland mills one year. In 1875 he came to Berwick and entered the employ of The JACKSON & WOODIN Manufacturing Company. He was first engaged to help the puddlers, then squeezing the iron, until he received in juries which necessitated his arm being amputated at the shoulder. As soon as he was able to resume work he was engaged in one of the offices, and there remained until the fall of 1878. He was then appointed superintendent of the rolling mill, which position he still fills. He married, in January, 1880, Fannie McBRIDE, and one child has blessed their union, Mabel T. Mrs. SHERWOOD is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. Lodge, No. 240.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 394)

SAMUEL E. SMITH, farmer, P. O. Berwick, was born in Mifflin Township Feb. 9, 1828, a son of Samuel and Jane (ENGLE) SMITH, the former a native of New Jersey and the latter of Mifflin Township. His great-grandfathers on both sides came from England and fought with WOLFE at the capture of Quebec. They afterward settled in New Jersey, purchased a farm and followed agriculture. The maternal grandfather, John ENGLE, came from New Jersey to this county in the latter part of the last century, while he was a young man, remained a short time, made a settlement, returned to New Jersey, where he married; then came back to this county and resided until his death. During the Revolution he drove four horses too an ambulance, and on one occasion the heads of the two leading animals were taken off by a cannon ball. He was among the early settlers of Mifflin Township, and used to farm the old Henry RITTENHOUSE farm, now owned by S. J. CONNER. Samuel SMITH was quite young when he came too this county. He followed farming and was accidentally killed by a train of cars. He reared a family of twelve children, nine of whom are still living. Samuel E. was reared in Mifflin Township, and there remained until the spring of 1865; in 1866 he moved to where he now resides and bought a farm of seventy-one acres, on which he has made all the improvements. part of his land is in the borough of Berwick. In 1850 he married Esther A. HULL, and they are the parents of four children, two of whom are living: Boyd M. and Ida M. Mr. and Mrs. SMITH are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He has served two terms as auditor, and has also served as supervisor and overseer of the poor. Our subject's maternal grandfather, while in the Revolution, was sent out to capture some cattle, which were in a field surrounded by a brush fence, and while thus engaged he received a buckshot wound. Mr. SMITH's father owned the first iron plow in this county, which he ordered made when he first settled at Mifflin. His nearest market at that time was Easton; fifteen and twenty bushels of grain were counted a big load.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 395)

J. D. THOMPSON, retired farmer, P. O. Berwick, was born in Berwick, Nov. 7, 1820, a son of Hugh and Nancy (DODSON) THOMPSON, the former of Scotch-Irish descent. His grandfather came from Ireland to this State at a very early day, and located in Berwich when there were but a few houses in the town. Our subject's father was only fourteen years of age when his parents moved to this county. He learned the potter's trade, but also carried on farming, owning a farm near Berwick. He died at the age of eighty-eight years, and was the father of six children: Richard, Alexander (deceased), Susanna (wife of Oliver EGE), Jane (deceased), Joseph D. and Elizabeth. The last named was born and reared in Berwick, and remained with his parents until 1866, when he moved to the farm where he now resides. He owns sixty-five acres of good land, but originally owned a great deal more, which he has sold off as town lots. He has been twice married; first, in 1847, to Mary BONAM, who bore him one child, now deceased. His first wife died in 1854, and in 1858 Mr. THOMPSON married May HULL, who has borne him two children, Hugh and Anna. Mr. and Mrs. THOMPSON are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He has served as town councilman for a number of years.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 395)

REV. E. H. YOCUM, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Berwick, was born in Columbia County, Penn., September 20, 1843, a son of Jesse and Martha (MEARS) YOCUM, natives of Pennsylvania and of German-Scotch descent. His ancestors, as far back as four or five generations, came from Germany, and first located in Berks County, but later moved to Columbia County during its early settlement, took up a large tract of land and carried on farming extensively. Jesse YOCUM was born in 1807 and was reared to agricultural pursuits, which he followed in Columbia County until 1849. He then moved to Union County, where he purchased a farm and remained a few years. He then sold out and removed to what is now Snyder County, which was then being organized. He moved next to the borough of Selin's Grove, where he remained a short time; thence to Northumberland County, where he purchased a farm and resided until his death in 1872. His wife died in September, 1843. Our subject was but seven days old when his mother died. He remained at home until about seventeen years of age, when he began teaching school; taught two years and also attended school. In 1860 he entered the old Bank of Northumberland, afterward organized as the First National Bank of Sunbury. He served the bank as clerk until the fall of 1866, when he entered Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, where he graduated in the classical course in June, 1868. He returned to the bank at the solicitation of his former employers, and remained twelve months. In March, 1869, he became a member of the Central Pennsylvania Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was sent to the Muhlenburg Circuit, Luzerne County, as his first appointment, and spent one year at this point; was next appointed to the Shickshinny station and served one year. In March, 1871, he was ordained a deacon, and at that conference was appointed to Hazelton, where he served as its pastor three years. His next appointment was at Newberry, or Seventh Ward, Williamsport, where he remained three years; thence went to Tyrone, Blair County, where he spent two years; thence to Bloomsburg, where he also remained two years. In March, 1881, he was appointed presiding elder of the Williamsport District, in which office he served four years. In 1885 he was appointed pastor of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Berwick, which charge he still retains. March 21, 1871, our subject married Laura M. CASLOW, a native of Harrisburg, Dauphin Co., Penn. They are the parents of four children, three living: George C., Lottie M. and John P. The deceased one was named Grace P. Mr. YOCUM is a finely educated gentleman, and has made a host of friends.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 395)

CHARLES H. ZEHNDER, secretary and superintendent of The JACKSON & WOODIN Manufacturing Company, Berwick, was born in Northumberland County, Penn., April 16, 1856, of German descent. His grandfather came from Germany in the early part of the present century. He followed his trade, that of a miller, nearly all his life, and was for some years a resident at Rupert, this county. Subject's father has spent most of his life in Columbia and Montour Counties; is also a miller by trade, and a resident of Danville. In 1874 he was employed as clerk in the Danville National Bank, which position he held until October, 1878. He then went to Harrisburg where he was employed as assistant secretary of the Y. M. C. A., and remained as such three months; thence moved to Norristown, where he was general secretary of the association for four months. He then resigned on account of ill health, and in March, 1879, was employed as private secretary to Col. Jackson, and remained in that position until the latter's death. After that event he served in same position for C. R. WOODIN for some time, when he was elected secretary of the company, and still retains that position, and in December, 1885, was also installed superintendent. He is one of the active members of the Y. M. C. A., having been president of the association, and was managing trustee during the erection of their building and is, at present, one of it's managers.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 396)

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